Education (MA)

Overview

Study for a prestigious MA in Education by distance learning

The programme offers a unique opportunity to study for an MA in Education that is at the cutting edge of education research. A wide range of high quality modules in a number of specialist areas enable you to tailor the programme to your individual interests and needs. The modules will be of interest to anyone interested in education: teachers, current or aspiring leaders in education, and education professionals involved in policy and development. Students are welcomed from anywhere around the world.

Drawing on research from across UCL Institute of Education, you explore the global forces that influence education. As part of an international cohort of students, you also critically reflect on new ideas in education and apply them to your own context. Students who wish to study a face-to-face version of this programme should apply through UCL Institute of Education.

How will I benefit?

This programme will help you to:

  • Identify and critically reflect upon key concepts in education.
  • Interrogate and question educational theory.
  • Understand the nature and significance of educational issues, and the ways in which research in education might illuminate them.
  • Prepare you for a range of roles in education (including leadership) and education policy making.
  • Improve your critical thinking, writing, and collaboration skills.
  • Prepare for an EdD or PhD in education.

Course summary

  You study Study period Cost (2016-2017)
MA 4 modules (30 credits each) plus dissertation module (60 credits) 1-5 years £11,905
Please note that fees are subject to annual review.

Choice

Two of the five modules you study are optional modules. With over 50 to choose from [PDF], you can tailor your study to suit your professional interests and needs.

Prestige

Designed to provide you with specialist professional knowledge, the MA in Education by distance learning is developed by world-leading academics at UCL Institute of Education. As the UK's largest research centre in the field of education, its commitment to influencing and shaping education around the globe can be seen in the extent and impact of its research internationally. UCL Institute of Education was ranked number one worldwide for Education in the QS 2015 World University Rankings.

Recognition for International Baccalaureate (IB) advanced certificate

Students on the MA in Education who have experience of working in an IB school context can now also apply for the IB Advanced Certificate in Teaching and Learning Research (PDF: 2pgs, 1080KB).

Individual modules

You can take individual modules of the MA as stand-alone modules. This is an ideal way to update your professional knowledge, enhance your career, or sample the programme. If you successfully complete the assessment for one or more individual modules you may be considered for progression to the MA in Education. If you are permitted to progress, up to two individual modules may be counted as credit. Individual modules cost £2,130 in 2016-2017.

Fully supported learning

You are supported by a personal tutor for the duration of your studies, including advice on module selection. For each core module, tutors mediate online discussions and provide advice and responses to individual queries. The Programme Director and Programme Administrator can also provide guidance and support on general academic and administrative issues. You access your study materials through the virtual learning environment, where you can discuss your work with fellow students and tutors. You also take part in live online lectures which are recorded and can be played back at a time convenient to you.

Summary of key dates

Education
Programme starts July start October start
Application deadline 16 May* 31 August*
Registration deadline 31 May* 15 September*
'What is Education?' (available as face to face and online) Starts 1 July, with two-week intensive course in late July 2016 (exact dates TBC) Taught over 10 weeks from October to December 2016 (exact dates TBC)
*Please note that if you intend to apply for a Student Visitor Visa you will need to allow at least three months for the processing of your visa request prior to the start of your programme. Therefore, you should ensure that you have started the process three months before the registration deadlines of 31 May (for July start) or 15 September (for October start). Students who wish to apply for a Tier 4 visa should apply via the UCL Institute of Education website.

Free education-related Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)

As part of our portfolio of online courses offered through Coursera, we have three education courses led by academics from the Institute of Education. Registration and participation in these online courses is free, with a small fee paid at the end of the course if you wish to receive a certificate from Coursera.  

Course start dates vary but for more information and to sign up for future sessions, please visit the following pages:
Structure

Structure and syllabus

You can tailor the MA in Education to suit your particular interests and needs.

MA: 4 modules (2 core, 2 optional) plus a dissertation

The academic year is split into three terms: Autumn (October-December), Spring (January-March) and Summer (April-June). Modules can be undertaken entirely by distance learning, others require attendance in London, or a combination of the two. Some modules may only be available in certain modes or in certain terms, so please take this into consideration when planning your studies. You can choose how many modules you take a year, and have between 1-5 years to complete the MA. Read our guidelines on how to plan your study programme [pdf 3pgs 87KB].

Core and optional module outlines for 2016-17 are given in the MA in Education module outlines [pdf 70pgs 1MB]. Please note that the option modules are subject to review each year. We will contact you if any modules you have selected are no longer available.

Core modules

  • What is Education?
  • Understanding Research.
  • Dissertation.

Optional modules

To ensure you get a balanced degree, optional modules are placed in blocks:

  • Curriculum, Specialism and Phases.
  • Designing and Assessing Learning.
  • Education and Society.

Each of your two optional modules should come from a different block.

Core modules

Core modules

What is Education?
MODE(S) of delivery Summer: Mixed mode or online / Autumn: face-to-face or online
TERM(S) Summer term (July - September); Autumn term (October - December)
DAY/TIME (Mixed mode only) Summer term: July to September: on-line plus two week intensive lecture programme 25 July – 5 August 2016 10:00 - 16:00.
Autumn term: October – December: once a week, Tuesday 17:30 - 20:30.
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module will introduce students to the main ideas, concepts and theories that underpin education and this programme of study. It will explore the study of education in an international context, reflecting on readings and theoretical ideas, as well as relating them to personal experience and contexts. It will also explore what is meant by scholarship in the study of education and the expectations of working at Masters level. The two-week lecture programme in July in London, or the 10 week sessions in the autumn term, will comprise daily keynote lectures from experts in their field of education, supported by group seminars. For the distance learning version, students will be able to participate via synchronous and asynchronous on-line activities. There will also be special sessions with a specific focus on support for academic writing.
ASSESSMENT 5000 word coursework assignment
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Understanding Research
MODE(S) of delivery The module will be offered in the following modes:
11 week face-to-face
11 week fully online (including induction)
TERM(S) Autumn (October – December) – face-to-face and online
Spring (January – March) – face-to-face and online
DAY/TIIME One evening a week (day to be confirmed) 17:30 – 20:30
MODULE DESCRIPTION

The module aims to provide participants with a grounding in educational and social research. The module will provide students the opportunity to:

  • explore the politics and purposes of different types of research;
  • investigate the range of theories of knowledge which underpin different approaches to research;
  • critically reflect on ethical issues for research and their own identity as a researcher;
  • become familiar with a range of research concepts and methods for data collection and analysis;
  • read and critique research within their own and other disciplines.

The following series of topics/ areas will be considered: aims and purposes of research, approaches and paradigms, research designs, research questions and hypotheses, choosing data collection methods, what constitutes data, data analysis, judging the quality of research, synthesis and use of research. Throughout the module ethical issues and the identity and role of the researcher will be considered.

ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000‐word coursework assignment.
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Dissertation - MA Education
MODE(S) of delivery Online
TERM(S) Autumn Term (October - December), Spring Term (January - March). Students will need a minimum of two terms’ study.
MODULE DESCRIPTION The dissertation is a key part of the MA in Education programme. The dissertation is an independent enquiry, guided with the support of a personal tutor. The topic/area of research will be agreed between the student and person tutor. It is likely to include an element of empirical data collection or fieldwork. The online tuition will comprise five stages: a dissertation proposal; review of relevant literature; research methodology including design, methods and ethics; execution and analysis of fieldwork/research; examination and submission.
ASSESSMENT

This module is assessed by a 20,000-word written dissertation (plus or minus 10%) excluding appendices. There is only one submission deadline on 1 October each year.

Please note: Students need to start their dissertation either in October or January (end of January the very latest).

 

Optional modules

To ensure you get a balanced degree, optional modules are placed in blocks (see below):

  • Curriculum, Specialism and Phases;
  • Designing and Assessing Learning;
  • Education and Society.

Option Modules available in Curriculum Specialisms and Phases Block

Study in London

Assessment for Learning
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face
TERM(S) Summer (26 April – 28 June)
DAY/TIME Tuesdays 17.30- 20.00 and two Saturdays, 12:00 - 17:00
MODULE DESCRIPTION Assessment for learning (sometimes known as formative assessment) has become an education ‘buzzword’ around the world, sometimes even being incorporated into education policy making. But meanings associated with the term have varied widely, as have claims concerning its effectiveness. This module aims to explore the concept of assessment for learning; posing questions like ‘what is assessment?’ and ‘what is learning?’ and ‘how can assessment support learning?’ in order to expose a range of possible answers. Although we will explore different approaches to implementing, practicing, and facilitating assessment for learning, the goal is not to equip you with the ‘tricks of the trade’ but to help you to be able to think deeply and critically about the fundamental principles involved.
ASSESSMENT Assessment will be by article review (1,000 words) and by coursework (4,000 words).
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Contemporary Issues and Debates in Primary Education
MODE(S) of delivery Face to face
TERM(S) Summer (April - June)
DAY/TIME Face to Face: x5 Wednesday evenings, 17:30 - 20:30 and 1 Saturday 10:00 – 16:30 (dates to be confirmed)
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module aims to challenge and enhance participants' knowledge and understanding of national and international issues central to primary education. The curriculum and its management as well as the impact of the learning environment on children’s progress will be considered. Participants will develop an understanding of the socio-political and situational factors that have influenced current debates and trends in primary education and will be encouraged to reflect upon the implications for their further professional practice. Sessions will examine policy development and initiatives in primary education in the UK and internationally related for example to: professional identity and the role of the teacher, inclusion, equity and achievement, assessment and standards, cross-cultural perspectives on pedagogy, extended schools. Implications for teaching and learning in the primary sector will be considered. Participants will be encouraged to reflect upon and share their experiences of primary settings both in and outside the UK and to develop an awareness of recent research and developments within schools and communities.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 4,500-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Experience or interest in Primary Education.
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Contemporary Art and Artists in Education
MODE(S) of delivery Face to Face
TERM(S) Autumn (October - December)
DAY/TIME 4 x Thursday evenings, 17.30 - 20.30 and 3 x whole day sessions during the October half term
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module offers you the opportunity to examine the significance of contemporary art and artists for education. Through a series of visual presentations, tutorials, seminars, workshops and gallery visits, you will investigate artists' engagement with contested spaces. This will entail a discussion of: definitions, education in contemporary art galleries, the role of residencies, contemporary art and its audiences and current exhibitions. Methodologically you are introduced to discourse analysis and invited to consider its potential for research in the field.
ASSESSMENT Assessment takes the form of a 5,000 word assignment.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Contemporary Issues in English Education
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-Face
TERM(S) Autumn (October - December)
DAY/TIME Wednesdays, 17:00 - 20:00
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module takes a theoretical and critical approach to five issues in contemporary English education, including; issues of gender, identity and diversity; the literary canon and the teaching of literature; multimodality and new literacies; the teaching of writing (including the teaching or not of ‘grammar’); culture outside the classroom (culture, texts, social practices) and how it relates to English learning and teaching in the classroom.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5,000 word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS A minimum of one year’s full-time (or equivalent) English language teaching experience.
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Critical Perspectives on Learning and Teaching
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-Face
TERM(S) Summer (April - June) 
DAY/TIME Wednesdays 17:30 – 20:00
MODULE DESCRIPTION With some core questions: What happens in classrooms? Why? And, what are the implications for learning? this module investigates classrooms as sites of (not) teaching and (not) learning. We will focus on the ways in which theories of teaching and learning, social interaction, identity and education shape how practitioners and researchers understand what takes place in classrooms. The module will integrate critical discussions of key readings; analyses of data excerpts including examples from our own practices; and participant inquiry into practice.
ASSESSMENT Assessment is by two, 1,000 word critical reviews of research and a 3,000 word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Early Childhood Education
MODE(S) of delivery Face to Face
TERM(S) Autumn (October - December)
DAY/TIME Mondays 17.30 - 19.30
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module covers key issues in the education and care of children under eight and focuses particularly on the provision made in early childhood settings for children from birth to five (the current English Early Years Foundation Stage). It is of interest both to those concerned with early childhood provision in the UK and to those with experience of other, international, contexts. Key themes include: the role of play in creative problem solving in early learning, and the types of curriculum and pedagogy that support successful outcomes for children; personal, social and emotional development including the development of a gendered and racialised identity; the development of communication skills; and inclusive practice, including the role of assessment in children's early learning. All sessions draw on recent research and emphasise the ways that this may inform policy and practice.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5,000 word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Learning and Teaching in Art and Design
MODE(S) of delivery Face to Face
TERM(S) Autumn (October-December)
DAY/TIME (face-to-face only) 3 x Tuesday evenings, 17.30 - 20.30, and 4 x whole day sessions during the February half-term
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module offers you the opportunity to explore how learning and teaching in art, craft and design can be investigated through personal engagement in practical, studio-based work. Through a series of tutorials, visual presentations, seminars and workshops the dynamic relationship between art and design activity, pedagogy and curriculum development is made explicit.
ASSESSMENT Assessment is based on a visual presentation and a written rationale (2,500 words).
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Previous experience of practical work in an area of art and design is normally required. Applicants who do not have a first degree in an art subject will need to submit an e-portfolio of their art practice with their application.
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Foundations of Science Education
MODE(S) of delivery Mixed mode (on-line and face-to-face)
TERM(S) Autumn (October - December)
DAY/TIME Thursdays, 17:30 – 20:30 (7 sessions face-to-face and 3 sessions on-line)
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module covers foundational topics essential for understanding and developing research in science education, with the aim of providing a perspective on practice. It draws on a range of relevant research and professional literature. Particular attention is given to the fluent use of concepts and theories related to the teaching and learning of science illuminating the thinking underpinning the aims, perspectives and construction of science curricula, learning theories and language in science education, historical and philosophical aspects of science education, within national and international contexts. Through a mixed mode approach of online and face-to-face teaching and learning, participants learn to write critical reviews of academic and professional articles in science education as well as developing theoretical frameworks from which to analyse their own practice. The module is suitable for participants involved in science teaching in primary, secondary or tertiary education and for science educators in other fields such as museum education. The module will be taught with some face to face and online sessions.
ASSESSMENT Assessment is through the equivalent of a 5,000 word essay
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Mathematics for Teachers
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face
TERM(S) 1: Summer (April-June)
2: (to be confirmed and if demand) two weeks intensive (probably Easter holidays and early summer holidays)
DAY/TIME Six Thursdays (or possibly, Mondays instead) 17:30 - 19:30 and three Saturdays, 10:00 - 16:30
MODULE DESCRIPTION The distinctive feature of this module is that participating students shall develop their mathematics subject knowledge through pedagogical experiences that are informed by theories of learning and teaching, innovative use of technology, professional teacher craft knowledge, national and international mathematics curricula and reasoned, critical engagement with Mathematics Education in a wide sense.
This option module provides an important role in bridging Professional Development and higher education in Mathematics Education as it addresses the National Council for Excellence in Teaching Mathematics criteria for Effective CPD: broadening and deepening mathematics content knowledge; developing mathematics-specific pedagogy and embedding it in practice; appreciating how learners engage with mathematics. (Adapted from ncetm.org.uk/resources/21049).
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5,000 word report consisting of three interconnected parts:
a: mathematical work (1,000 word equivalent)
b: personal reflections on doing the mathematical work and resulting questions to investigate (1,500 words)
c: a literature-informed essay answering the questions from [b] (2,500 words).
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Either: a practicing teacher of mathematics, including a primary teacher of any Key Stage or an FE numeracy teacher, or holding a post 16 mathematics qualification.
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Shakespeare in Education
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face
TERM(S) Spring (January-March)
DAY/TIME Wednesdays 17:30 - 20:00
MODULE DESCRIPTION This Master’s level module offers a broad-based exploration of Shakespeare’s place in education (both nationally and internationally) and asks specifically what historical, cultural and ideological factors have helped shape Shakespeare’s centrality in the English National Curriculum. Students will be invited to consider the production of ‘Shakespeare’ in different contexts (eg classrooms, youth groups and theatres) and in different modes (eg printed playtext, film and computer games). In addition to conventional seminar discussions, sessions will include practical workshops, a live theatre visit and introduction to games-authoring software. The Module aims to help students develop a critical awareness of theories about cultural practice and their application to Shakespeare and gain new insights into young people’s interactions with Shakespeare.
ASSESSMENT

This module is assessed either by:
a: a 5,000‐word essay
or
b: a 15 minute oral presentation plus a 2,500-word critical reflection.

SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Understanding Mathematics Education
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-Face
TERM(S) Autumn (October - December)
DAY/TIME Thursdays, 17:30 - 20:30
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module addresses significant issues in mathematics education at all levels of education. The role of mathematical knowledge in the curriculum and in teaching and learning is a major theme, as is the role of the social context in which mathematics and mathematics education are done. This includes consideration of mathematics in the workplace and in different cultural settings as well as issues of gender, social class, language and assessment. Participants are introduced to the research literature and consider how different orientations to mathematics, learning and teaching affect research, policy and practice.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by a 5,000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS A degree in a mathematics-rich subject or education, or equivalent experience teaching mathematics
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Distance Learning Modules

Communicating Geography in Education
MODE(S) of delivery Online
TERM(S) Autumn (October - December) Spring (January - March)
DAY/TIME N/A
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module takes the view that Geography is a resource with educational potential. We look at current (and past) debates in Geography and ask what value this has for the school student. In this module, you will have engaged with current debates in academic Geography and will have considered what importance this has for the Geography taught in the classroom.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by a 5000-word article on an aspect of geography and how it relates to education.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT Cresswell, T. (2013) Geographic Thought: A Critical Introduction. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. (From £15) This is a contemporary text that describes geography’s origins and more recent trends in the academic discipline.

 

Critical Perspectives on Learning and Teaching - online
MODE(S) of delivery Online
TERM(S) Spring (January - March)
DAY/TIME N/A
MODULE DESCRIPTION With some core questions: What happens in learning environments? Why? and, What are the implications for teaching and learning? This module investigates learning environments as sites of (not) teaching and (not) learning. Participants in the module will focus on the ways in which theories of teaching and learning, social interaction, identity and education shape how practitioners and researchers understand what takes place in educational settings.
Students will:
• critically examine contemporary teaching and learning practices: their historical and cultural roots, their underlying assumptions, and their educational advantages and problems
• engage with multiple methods and theoretical perspectives for investigating classroom practice and
• conduct inquiry, engaging with reflection, into their own or another’s teaching or learning context.
ASSESSMENT Assessment is by two, 1,000 word critical reviews of research and a 5,000 word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Some experience in a teaching and learning environment would be useful but is not mandatory.
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Curriculum Policy and Practice

 

MODE(S) of delivery Online
TERM(S) Spring (January - March) and Summer (April - June)
DAY/TIME N/A
MODULE DESCRIPTION Through online synchronous seminars, and asynchronous presentations the module aims to provide participants with new analytical and critical skills with regard to their curricular interests and responsibilities, in particular: an improved ability to 'read' curriculum materials, practices and policies in the light of the theoretical principles and ideological perspectives that inform them; an enhanced appreciation of the philosophical roots of issues in curriculum design and development; a better understanding of design and development strategies; and a capacity for deeper reflection on their own experience of curriculum. Since curriculum design is concerned with decisions about the knowledge to be taught, we spend time exploring different conceptions of knowledge. The course aims to deepen participants’ understanding of the different approaches to Curriculum, linking these to relevant policy and always relating back to students’ own professional practice where possible. It also explores the underlying theoretical concepts in the field. Its basis is to reject the idea that the curriculum is something to be delivered, but instead to promote the development of teachers as curriculum thinkers. Themes include: Background to study of curriculum, The role of knowledge, The hidden and extended curricula, Socio-historical perspectives on the curriculum, The relationship between childhood, schooling and curriculum, The role of ethnicity, class and gender in curriculum, Progressive schooling and curriculum reform, Conceptions of rural and urban curricula.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 3000-word essay and a 5-minute podcast equivalent to 1000 words.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Digital Technologies for Mathematical Learning
MODE(S) of delivery Online with two optional face to face sessions
TERM(S) Spring (January - March)
DAY/TIME Two optional face to face sessions on Saturdays
MODULE DESCRIPTION This is an online module, with two optional face-to-face contact based sessions. Throughout the course, you will be given opportunities to familiarise yourself with a wide range of digital tools and resources (graph plotters, dynamic geometry environments, statistical software, fully interactive online packages). You will be encouraged and supported to critically appraise research to reflect on the implications of using digital technologies for learning and teaching of mathematics in the areas of generalising, expressing, visualising and modelling. You will study in a flexible way that works for you, guided by a set weekly timetable.
Over the ten week module you will follow three cycles of reading relevant research, task design and trials, followed by critical evaluation of the technology-enhanced learning experiences of maths and science.
ASSESSMENT A single essay (5,000 words), which will comprise the design and evaluation of a sequence of mathematical activities that exploits the possibilities of digital technologies. For this piece of work, students can extend one of the three themed activity tasks, or focus on a new area of learning.
This piece of work will document either or both:
a) your personal development of a mathematical idea or topic based on your exploration of digital technology; and
b) Your experiences designing and trialling the teaching and learning of a mathematical idea or topic that exploits digital technology.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS None – we do expect some experience related to teaching mathematics or using mathematics in teaching another subject.
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Effective Learning in History
MODE(S) of delivery Online or mixed mode (most of the teaching is online but there are three Saturday seminars which can be face-to-face or virtual).
TERM(S) Autumn (October - December)
DAY/TIME Online for most of the course
Three Saturday seminars (dates to be confirmed).
Usually there is one in October/November, one in December and one in January.
The seminars last from 10:30 - 15:30 but can be attended asynchronously and online as well as face-to-face and synchronously.
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module focuses on how we can build effective learning in history through scholarship and pedagogic design. There are three key foci: 1. The conceptual challenges of learning history; 2. How we can make history accessible and challenging for all age groups; and 3. How history teachers can enhance their practice by engaging with the professional community of history teachers and also with academic history and historians.
The assignment focuses on addressing a practical pedagogic challenge (e.g. designing teaching around a particular historical context). It is typically an action research project (although this is not a requirement).
The module is suitable for both primary and secondary history teachers.
The module can be taken by students who are teachers or by students who are looking at a context outside the classroom (e.g. pedagogy at an historical site).
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS 2.2 in History or related discipline (e.g. Archaeology). Relevant pedagogic experience.
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Issues of Concern in Education
MODE(S) of delivery Online
TERM(S) Summer (April– June)
DAY/TIME N/A
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module explores what becomes an issue of concern in education. Focussing primarily (but not exclusively on secondary geography, maths, science and business education) the module considers how topics become issues of concern, the range of viewpoints held about them and what educators can do about them. Topics covered reflect the “issues” of the day but also include curriculum pressures and reform, changing trends in pedagogy and other key influences on education including those at the global scale.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Leading the Geography Curriculum
MODE(S) of delivery Online
TERM(S) Autumn (October - December)
MODULE DESCRIPTION

This module takes a specific emphasis on curriculum leadership. It aims to engage students in deep, critical thought about curriculum development practice therefore, with a view to improving the quality of the geography curriculum experience for young people. Thus, it is a practitioner-focused and research-focused module which requires participants to share their experiences and understanding with each other, as well as reflecting on theoretical ideas.
Reflecting a move within schools to see teachers as curriculum leaders, the module asks students to critically engage with the idea of subject leadership, and to question what this means in relation to how curriculum is written, read and enacted.
This module aims to engage students in:
• Deep critical thought about curriculum development practice with a view to improving the quality of the geography curriculum experience for young people.
• Richer theoretical understanding of curriculum development in geographical education.
• Integration of theoretical knowledge and understanding with their own experiences and practices in schools and education.

Through their active participation in this module students will:
• Understand that teaching geography is more than just a technical problem but requires teachers to engage with moral and political complexities.
• Develop knowledge and understanding of geography curriculum theory and practice.
• Explain and defend the choices they make in their local curriculum making.
• Understand the role that young people play in the construction of the curriculum and reflect this in their planning.
• Understand that the context (both local and national) impacts on curriculum design.
• Contribute to broader debates and consultations about national curriculum frameworks.
• Take a critical perspective on what is meant by subject leadership, and how this relates to a teacher’s responsibility towards the curriculum and how it is experienced by students.

ASSESSMENT The module is assessed via a 5000 word essay related to leading the geography curriculum through their local research-informed curriculum-making.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Music Technology in Education
MODE(S) of delivery Online
TERM(S) Spring (January - March)
DAY/TIME N/A
MODULE DESCRIPTION The module provides a critical introduction to and development of specialist expertise in using music technology in six core areas: sound and its properties; basic audio processing; introduction to MIDI; digital audio basics; basic recording; and introduction to music sequencing. It will also address the symbiotic relationship of research and practice in the field. As music technology is now integral to the preparation of teachers in Music, participants will critically review music technology through: focusing on the issues and challenges of creative applications of music technology to music education; engaging with key literatures and commentaries in relation to specialist use of music technology, teaching and learning with technology in music, electro-acoustic and electronic music; and engaging in reflective self analysis in relation to their own practice in teaching and learning with creative music technology. Discussion for further study will also be conducted, rehearsing applications and pathways for creative music technology; the future of music technology; issues, challenges and implications for music technology and music education; and creative and aesthetic issues in music technology.
ASSESSMENT The module is assessed by a portfolio comprising practical, written and discussion tasks undertaken and submitted online throughout the module and a written assignment (2000 words) undertaken after the online teaching so as to critically explore key issues introduced through the course of study.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS We do not require students to have prior knowledge of music technology (that is, experience of working with digital or analogue technology that is used for the creation, storage or further processing of sound). Students are, however, expected to have a reasonable non-specialist user’s knowledge of general computer use, including using email and attachments, typical computer peripherals (e.g. CDROM, printer, soundcard, USB and backup devices) using the Internet, and word processing. Students will need to log in to the Moodle virtual learning environment and check their email account at least daily for the duration of the module. They will need regular and open access to a computer with a soundcard, speakers and Internet connection (broadband is recommended) upon which they can install software. This should be either the student’s own workstation or a computer over which they have administrative privileges. The computer will need to be running under a recent version of Microsoft Windows or Mac OS operating systems. Software is selected for use on the basis that it is freely available as freeware, GNU Public Licence, or shareware (in this case, we will be making use of only the freely usable functionality). As part of the course, students may be expected to download the required software from suggested websites and install it on their own computers.
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Religion and School Life
MODE(S) of delivery Mixed mode: online with three “live” Saturday seminars that can be attended at the IOE in person or by completing alternative activities online.
TERM(S) Spring (January - March)
DAY/TIME Saturday seminars scheduled for 14th Jan , 4th Feb, 4th Mar 2017 . All scheduled for 11am to 3pm.
MODULE DESCRIPTION Recent public debates about the wearing of religious symbols, head coverings, for example or the publication of cartoons containing images of the Prophet Muhammad considered haram by most Muslims, have highlighted the controversial nature of religion in public life. Of particular concern to educators are the religious and moral issues affecting children and young people in school. Should creationism, for example, be taught in schools? Why are all schools required to have a daily act of worship by law and should this practice continue? Are faith schools desirable in a modern liberal democratic country like Britain or socially divisive?
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

You can also download a copy of all module descriptions.

Option Modules available in Designing and Assessing Learning Block

Distance Learning Modules

Principles and Practices of Development Education
MODE(S) of delivery Online
TERM(S) Autumn (October to December)
DAY/TIME N/A
MODULE DESCRIPTION Development education is an approach to learning that leads to a greater understanding of global inequalities, including of why they exist and what can be done about them. It encourages learners of all ages to explore how global issues link in with their everyday lives. This online module aims to encourage a critical understanding of the key principles and practices of development education. As a result of completing the module, students will have: greater understanding of the relationships between international development and development education; developed skills to critically assess approaches to development education and relate them to their own perspectives and experiences; an increased appreciation of the cultures and social foundations of a range of development education practices. The module has five themes which are explored through the online discussions: Development and Development Education; Aims and Principles of Development Education; Education: What’s in a Name?; Research Perspectives in Development Education; Putting Development Education Theory into Practice.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by two essays of 1500-words each.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Technology and Education Beyond the Classroom
MODE(S) of delivery Online
TERM(S) Summer (April - June)
DAY/TIME N/A
MODULE DESCRIPTION The module focuses on questions of pedagogy and education for supporting learners outside of classroom settings. This would include, for example, online education, mobile learning used as part of a formal curriculum, learning with technology in the workplace, the use of virtual worlds in education and the use of the internet to support homework. These areas are considered in relation to: learning in different contexts; using technology across different contexts; teaching across different contexts; assessing across different contexts; designing programmes of study; evaluation and quality. The module is taught primarily using a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). There will also be limited use of Second Life (an interactive Virtual World) and technologies such as wikis and blogs within the VLE.
ASSESSMENT The module will be assessed by structured portfolio submitted via the VLE. This is likely to involve three short pieces of writing, together totalling approximately 5000 words.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Distance Learning or Study in London

Assessment: Issues and Practice
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face and online
TERM(S) Face to Face: Autumn (October - December). Online: Spring (January - March) term may change.
DAY/TIME Wednesdays, 17:30 – 20:30 (Face-to-face version) day will change - to be confirmed.
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module aims to deepen participants' understanding of the different purposes of assessment and the underlying theoretical concepts in the field. It addresses both summative ('assessment of learning') and formative ('assessment for learning') uses. Some of the key features of summative assessment that will be explored include: validity, reliability, bias and fairness. Formative issues include validity, learning intentions, feedback and peer/self assessment. Issues explored include accountability, assessment policy, international assessment and vocational assessment.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed 1000-word critical review of a module reading plus a 4000-word critical essay relating to one of the key issues explored during the course or about an assessment practice, programme or policy with which you have been involved.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT Isaacs, Tina, Catherine Zara and Graham Herbert. (2013) Key Concepts in Educational Assessment. London: Sage.

 

Study in London

Education, Ethics and Imagination in a Globalising World
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face
TERM(S) Spring (January – March)
DAY/TIME Day or evening
MODULE DESCRIPTION Recent decades have seen a flurry of research and publication on the role of imagination and ethics in education (see indicative bibliography below). This is partly because of the growing anthropological, neurological and entrepreneurial interest in creativity and partly because of the widespread belief that the influence of globalisation on education has generally led to a disproportionate emphasis on subjects and pedagogies that privilege instrumental interest of reason at the expense of critical, imaginative and ethical spaces in educational practice. This has led to the calls for a deeper and active integration of ethics and imagination in educational theory and practice. With imagination and ethics as central elements, the module will have three inter-related strands: a critical introduction to debates about the nature of globalization with a particular focus on education; an in-depth exploration of imagination and ethics, their dialectic and place in education and application of theoretical insights to concrete curricular contexts. Course readings, classroom teaching and student assignments – all of these pedagogical elements will aim to help students apply ideas to their own cultural and national contexts. Overall, the participants will acquire analytical and pedagogical tools to observe, understand and critique structures of power and hegemony perpetuated through globalising nature of knowledge production and dissemination.
ASSESSMENT 5000-word essay
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT To be decided.

 

Guiding Effective Learning and Teaching
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-Face
TERM(S) Autumn (October - December)
DAY/TIME Tuesdays, 17:30 – 20:00 and some Saturdays October - December
MODULE DESCRIPTION Drawing on relevant authors’ writing and participants’ experience, this module aims to stimulate critical reflections and actions, in response to the following questions: Which learning outcomes are valuable and why? How does learning happen? Which factors influence it? Your own learning will be through discussion of readings led by tutors, participants and guest authors. Beliefs about which outcomes are valuable, how learning happens and which factors influence it will be examined both in the literature and in practice, inside the MA classroom, inside school or college classrooms and in non-classroom settings. Participants will be guided in the use of learning journals as reflections on learning, and invited to support other participants in making these reflections.
ASSESSMENT A 3500-word piece of reflective writing; a further 1000-word peer assessed written assignment and a 1000-word review of an article from the module readings.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Fundamentals of Second and Foreign Language Teaching
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face
TERM(S) Summer (April-June)
DAY/TIME not yet known
MODULE DESCRIPTION

This module examines critically the theoretical orientations which underpin print and non-print language teaching materials designed for a range of contexts. It explores the processes of production and adaptation of materials. The circumstances in which materials design takes place and the criteria for the selection, creation and sequencing of texts and tasks are considered. There will be group and individual opportunities for evaluating, adapting and creating materials, and for discussing the process and products of these tasks. The aim is that participants should demonstrate a critical understanding of the key principles addressed during the module, and that these assessments should provide the foundations for materials evaluation, design and development in the participants' future professional lives.

ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by a 5000-word written assignment.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Two years full-time foreign/second language teaching experience
CORE TEXT McGrath, I. (2002). Materials evaluation and design for language teaching. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

 

Language Teacher Identity and Development
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face
TERM(S) Spring (January – March)
DAY/TIME Tuesday evening (time to be confirmed)
MODULE DESCRIPTION Becoming a language teacher and developing professionally implies a wide variety of very different things depending on the setting in which prospective candidates receive their initial training/education, the type of in-service education they receive, the roles they are expected to fulfil, the recognition they are accorded and the ways in which they are expected to work. Becoming a language teacher also entails the negotiation/construction of a new professional identity and its renewal and development throughout the career path - processes in which issues of individual agency and structural constraints are central. This module examines fundamental areas of contemporary thinking on teacher development – the growth of research on teacher cognition, the ‘sociocultural turn’ in teacher education and the rise of the concept of the reflective practitioner. At the same time, it considers the macro context of the marketization of language teacher education globally and the ways in which teachers’ professional identities are increasingly shaped by the demands of political economy. The ways in which these macro processes interact with teachers’ raced, classed and gendered identities are also considered. The module aims to allow teachers to develop their careers and assume leadership roles with regard to teacher development in their institutions.
ASSESSMENT The module will be assessed by a 4,000 word essay which requires students to design a teacher education programme and to provide a rationale for the form it takes. The teacher education programme can be either an initial or an in-service programme and should be included in an appendix in grid/chart format. The grid/chart is also part of the assessment. The essay should 1) provide a short, clear description of the context for which the teacher education programme has been designed; 2) a detailed rationale for its content and the principles underpinning this; 3) a discussion which demonstrates the extent to which the principles on which the programme is based is evidenced in the programme design; and 4) appropriate reference to the teacher education literature. The grid/chart should provide a clear overview of the content of the course.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS The module is only suitable for those with a minimum of two years second language teaching experience.
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Learning and Teaching With Technologies
MODE(S) of Delivery Face-to-Face
TERM(S) Spring (January - March)
DAY/TIME Wednesdays, 17:00 – 20:00
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module provides an introduction to key issues related to technology - enhanced learning and teaching. The module places an emphasis on providing students with informed and practical basis for critiquing and evaluating technologies as tools for supporting learning in diverse contexts of use. Pedagogical theories that are pertinent to technology design and use are reviewed to provide the students with grounding that is necessary for understanding different technology - enhanced learning designs and implementations, both in terms of the software functionality and its use in situ. Technology design methods are reviewed and practically evaluated to provide students with an informed framework and critical thinking to ols for assessing the pedagogical affordances of diverse technologies. The role of the teacher, parent and child along with the role of researchers and technology developers will be reviewed and discussed in order to draw the students’ attention to the new opportunities for learning and teaching that technology offers. Amongst these a special attention will be placed to discussing the critical role of educational practitioners in successful technology - enhanced learning and the potential benefits of technolo gy to their understanding of and innovation in their own practices. Exemplars of innovative teaching and learning initiatives will be used to provide a focus for critical evaluation of different technological designs and usage. Some of these case studies will be constructed by the students themselves during the course of the module as a way of promoting reflection on the current technology - enhanced learning practices and to foster in students an appreciation of the different ways in which technologies may be embedded in the classrooms and other learning and teaching contexts.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Materials Development for Language Teaching
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-Face
TERM(S) Spring (April - June)
DAY/TIME tbc
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module examines critically the theoretical orientations which underpin language teaching materials designed for a range of contexts, and explores the processes of materials analysis, evaluation, adaptation and production. The module considers published materials at two levels: 1) as curriculum artefacts designed to provide teachers and students with linguistic and thematic content, activities for controlled and freer practice of language, and texts and activities for the development of receptive and productive skills; and 2) as cultural artefacts which seek to make the target language mean in particular ways, while at the same time frequently reproducing (but occasionally challenging) dominant ideologies of gender, sexual orientation, class and race. We also explore the ways in which materials relate to curriculum and syllabus and consider the circumstances in which materials design takes place and the criteria for the choice and sequencing of activities with a view to the selection, evaluation, adaptation, design and appropriation of classroom materials. The role of technology is considered throughout the module.
ASSESSMENT The module will be assessed by a portfolio consisting of a 3,000 word essay and a set of materials for 8 hours of teaching in an educational setting chosen by the student.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS A minimum of two years full time experience (or equivalent part time) of (English) language teaching to second/ foreign language learners or bilingual students.
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Philosophy of Education: Knowledge, Mind and Understanding
MODE(S) of delivery Face to Face
TERM(S) Summer (April - June)
DAY/TIME Seven Sessions on Tuesdays 17:00 - 20:00  plus one full Saturday
MODULE DESCRIPTION The nature of the human mind is a matter of permanent interest to all those concerned with education. Recent developments in neuroscience have prompted heightened debate on the subject between philosophers, psychologists and sociologists. Similar theoretical and practical complexities arise in relation to the nature of knowledge and understanding. All these matters invite and require philosophical illumination. The course will consider, from a philosophical perspective, major questions regarding the nature of mind, knowledge, understanding and their educational significance. In this process, it will open up presuppositions implicit in both education practice and research. The module will enable students to explore the presup-positions of epistemology and mind involved in a range of educational questions. This will involve consideration of perspectives on the Mind-World issue present in different models of learning (eg Information-processing, Piagetian, Vygotskian); the implications of these perspectives for learning, curriculum development and knowledge; different characterizations of concepts and concept formation; the impact of assumptions on practice and on the affective and motivational dimensions of learning. Although the module will approach the area of knowledge, mind and understanding from a philosophical perspective, it will include inter-disciplinary elements.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

You can also download a copy of all module descriptions.

Option Modules available in Education and Society Block

Distance Learning Modules

Debates in the History of Education
MODE(S) of delivery Online only
TERM(S) Autumn (October - December)
DAY/TIME Online only
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module offers participants the opportunity to re-think education and learning from a historical perspective and engages with enduring debates in education policy and practice. International perspectives on education, social change and inequality over the past two centuries are addressed. The module studies key themes and concepts in education in an international perspective. The range of topics include colonialism and national identity, education and the economy, youth and leisure, labour and social movements, literacy, the state and education, and childhood and social welfare. In addressing these issues, the module draws upon themes such as justice and fairness in education as well as inequalities relating to class, gender, race and disability. A range of primary historical sources will be utilised, for example, documents and archives, literary, biographical, archival, visual and material evidence. History of education has a long research tradition which connects to both the study of history and education as well as drawing upon other humanities and social sciences. Student work has previously been published in the History of Education Researcher.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Study in London

Economic Perspectives Of Education Policy
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face
TERM(S) Autumn (October-December)
DAY/TIME Wednesdays 17:30 – 20:30
MODULE DESCRIPTION The economics of education applies the principles of economics to the analysis of education and education policy. This course is designed to give an overview of the entire field of economics of education to students who are new to economics, as well as to those who have previously studied economics. The module introduces the most fundamental and important concepts in economics and explains how they relate to education. Human capital theory and its application to estimating rates of return to education are examined. The demand for education and education supply by providers (both state and private) are studied. The main criteria for evaluating policy – efficiency and equity – are applied throughout the module, and to different stages of education.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000‐word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Education, Ethics and Imagination in a Globalising World
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face
TERM(S) Spring (January – March)
DAY/TIME Day or evening
MODULE DESCRIPTION Recent decades have seen a flurry of research and publication on the role of imagination and ethics in education (see indicative bibliography below). This is partly because of the growing anthropological, neurological and entrepreneurial interest in creativity and partly because of the widespread belief that the influence of globalisation on education has generally led to a disproportionate emphasis on subjects and pedagogies that privilege instrumental interest of reason at the expense of critical, imaginative and ethical spaces in educational practice. This has led to the calls for a deeper and active integration of ethics and imagination in educational theory and practice. With imagination and ethics as central elements, the module will have three inter-related strands: a critical introduction to debates about the nature of globalization with a particular focus on education; an in-depth exploration of imagination and ethics, their dialectic and place in education and application of theoretical insights to concrete curricular contexts. Course readings, classroom teaching and student assignments – all of these pedagogical elements will aim to help students apply ideas to their own cultural and national contexts. Overall, the participants will acquire analytical and pedagogical tools to observe, understand and critique structures of power and hegemony perpetuated through globalising nature of knowledge production and dissemination.
ASSESSMENT 5000-word essay
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT To be decided.

 

Education and Muslim Communities
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face
TERM(S) Summer (April - June)
DAY/TIME 6 full days during April, 10:00 – 17:00, dates to be confirmed
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module will primarily focus on exposing participants to the historical, geographical, political, economic and cultural underpinnings of education in a host of Muslim communities. It will elucidate the state of education and seek understanding and explanation of such educational provision in the light of global declarations such as Education for All (Dakar 2000, Jomtien 1990); Human Rights Declaration (1948); and the universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity (UNESCO 2002), which have been ratified by the vast majority of the world's countries. Consequently the module will critically investigate current global efforts and approaches to improve educational provision. National and regional case studies will be presented to illuminate the interconnected areas of concern and issues and challenges to appreciate education in Muslim communities. Case studies will reflect the geographical range of Muslim communities: majoritarian Muslim countries, countries with significant Muslims, and regions where the settlement of Muslims is a relatively new phenomena.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Education and Technology: Key Issues and Debates
MODE(S) of delivery Mixed mode: online with 5 sessions face-to-face: Tuesday 6 and 20 October, 3 and 17 November and 1 December 17:00 – 19:00
TERM(S) Autumn (October - December)
DAY/TIME N/A
MODULE DESCRIPTION The use of information and communications technology (ICT) is now a central part of education provision and practice. This module introduces students to some of the key issues in the field and addresses some fundamental and often unvoiced questions about the burgeoning development and implementation of digital technologies in education. The module will cover the use of digital technologies in compulsory and post-compulsory educational settings, drawing on examples from several different countries. We will consider the following key questions about education and technology: What is education technology – and why does it matter?; Is technology inevitably going to change education? What can history tell us about education and technology? Does technology improve learning? Does technology make education fairer? Will technology displace the teacher? Will technology displace the education institution? What does the future hold? The module involves student engagement with the research literature, use of education technology resources, and a number of practical activities.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000 word essay
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Educational Traditions and Systems in Europe
MODE(S) of delivery Face to Face
TERM(S) Spring (January - March)
DAY/TIME Tuesdays 17:00 – 20:00
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module will examine some of the major traditions of education in Europe with an emphasis on secondary schooling and post-compulsory education and training in the EU states. Through holistic historical and contemporary case studies of education systems in England, France, Germany, Scandinavia and Finland, and the Soviet Union, the course will analyse the significant difference in the dominant regional systems in terms of their institutional structures, curricula and modes of regulation and governance and relate these to the varying political, cultural and economic contexts which shape them. The course will employ comparative methods to identify convergent and divergent trends within European education, to analyse their causes and to assess the role of EU institutions in addressing the important policy dilemmas that face education in Europe. The analysis of these trends will be used to test the claims of a number of theories on system change. The module will also discuss how the different education systems respond to contemporary pressures and issues such as school choice, competitiveness and diversity.
ASSESSMENT This module is currently assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

English in Diverse World Contexts
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face
TERM(S) Spring (January - March)
DAY/TIME tbc
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module deals with the role of English in diverse world contexts. It provides a theoretical background to the global spread of English from the perspectives of globalization theory, postcolonial theory and the politicization of world Englishes. It examines English as an international language and as a lingua franca, and explores different regions of the world with regard to English language education policy and the effects of English in these contexts. Regions covered include East Asia, South Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, Central and South America, and the countries of the Anglophone ‘inner circle’. The impact of English in cyberspace is also explored. Students taking this module can expect critical engagement in discussions about the role of English in the world today, as well as in the beliefs about what this should be.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by a coursework assignment of 5000 words in length.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Gender, Sexuality and Education
MODE(S) of delivery Face to Face (intensive)
TERM(S) Spring (February)
DAY/TIME (face-to-face only) To be confirmed
MODULE DESCRIPTION The module aims to encourage a critical examination of key debates concerning theory, research and practice in the field of gender and education. The module will engage with a number of key debates in the field, including, feminist theory and methodologies in educational research, analysing gender and educational policies, researching sexualities, femininities and masculinities, pedagogical approaches, gendered behavior, educational achievement and more. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding how gender, sexuality, race and class intersect in shaping educational experiences and outcomes. The module will draw out important issues relating to professional practice in international contexts, providing teachers, researchers, leaders and managers, and those working in non-government organisations a forum for investigating their own interests in the field of gender and education.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A
Language Teacher Identity and Development
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face
TERM(S) Spring (January – March)
DAY/TIME Tuesday evening (time to be confirmed)
MODULE DESCRIPTION Becoming a language teacher and developing professionally implies a wide variety of very different things depending on the setting in which prospective candidates receive their initial training/education, the type of in-service education they receive, the roles they are expected to fulfil, the recognition they are accorded and the ways in which they are expected to work. Becoming a language teacher also entails the negotiation/construction of a new professional identity and its renewal and development throughout the career path - processes in which issues of individual agency and structural constraints are central. This module examines fundamental areas of contemporary thinking on teacher development – the growth of research on teacher cognition, the ‘sociocultural turn’ in teacher education and the rise of the concept of the reflective practitioner. At the same time, it considers the macro context of the marketization of language teacher education globally and the ways in which teachers’ professional identities are increasingly shaped by the demands of political economy. The ways in which these macro processes interact with teachers’ raced, classed and gendered identities are also considered. The module aims to allow teachers to develop their careers and assume leadership roles with regard to teacher development in their institutions.
ASSESSMENT The module will be assessed by a 4,000 word essay which requires students to design a teacher education programme and to provide a rationale for the form it takes. The teacher education programme can be either an initial or an in-service programme and should be included in an appendix in grid/chart format. The grid/chart is also part of the assessment. The essay should 1) provide a short, clear description of the context for which the teacher education programme has been designed; 2) a detailed rationale for its content and the principles underpinning this; 3) a discussion which demonstrates the extent to which the principles on which the programme is based is evidenced in the programme design; and 4) appropriate reference to the teacher education literature. The grid/chart should provide a clear overview of the content of the course.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS The module is only suitable for those with a minimum of two years second language teaching experience.
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Leadership in Early Childhood Education
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face
TERM(S) Summer (April - June)
DAY/TIME Delivered in four Study Blocks, 3 Study Blocks of one Friday evening and all day Saturday, 1 Study Block of all day Saturday during the months of April, May and June. Evenings: 17:30 to 20:30. All day: 10:00 to 17:00.
MODULE DESCRIPTION The module aims to develop a critical awareness of national and international policies in early childhood services and effective leadership of policy and practice. The engagement with current debates and issues, theories, research and leadership practices, promotes a deeper understanding of leading policy and practice in early childhood services. There is opportunity for students to critically examine leadership practices within early years contexts and early childhood services.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Relevant professional, management and/or leadership experience (for at least one year) in early years provision and/or children’s services. Those interested in entering leadership positions are also considered.
CORE TEXT n/a

 

Leading and Managing Change and Improvement
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face only
TERM(S) Autumn (October - December)
DAY/TIME Thursdays, 17:30 – 20:30
MODULE DESCRIPTION The key topics of educational leadership and management will be considered from both theoretical and practical perspectives, examining the differences between these concepts as they apply in the field. There will be an introduction to the importance of moral, educational and transformational leadership. Learning-centred leadership and system leadership will be defined and its main features discussed. The cultural context is also examined along with organisational structure, culture and power. Key matters of managing educational improvement and change are examined and attention given to strategies for managing change effectively. If improvement takes place, measurement of that improvement is part of the process. An introduction to the field of school improvement and effectiveness research, policy and practice will be provided and the key concepts of internal and external evaluation defined and differentiated from related concepts like monitoring and assessment.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word written assignment.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Learners, Learning and Teaching in the Context of Education for All
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face
TERM(S) Spring (January - March)
DAY/TIME Wednesdays, 14:00 - 17:00
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module will look critically at current theories, policies, practice and approach to learning and teaching in the context of Education For All (EFA). It will provide participants with an awareness of political, social, cultural and linguistic contexts in which teaching and learning take place. It will analyse challenges faced by governmental and non-governmental agencies in providing quality education for all. It will examine debates about planning and selection of knowledge, especially as related to teacher education and curriculum development systems in developing contexts. Particular attention will be paid to debates about the approach and intent of the EFA movement with regard to aspects of learning and teaching for vulnerable, dis-enfranchised, subordinated or excluded groups, and to contexts of violence and conflict. The experience of this movement in relation to discussions of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and post-2015 educational agendas will also be considered.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Perspectives on Adult Literacy, Language and Numeracy
MODE(S) of delivery Face to face
TERM(S) Spring (January - March)
DAY/TIME 10 x Tuesdays 17:00 - 20:00
MODULE DESCRIPTION Following national and international initiatives over the last decade, the field of adult literacy, language and numeracy (ALLN) has risen to a position of prominence in the UK and worldwide. This flurry of policy action demands renewed attention to what English and Maths mean in post-school contexts and how ALLN impact on national and local economies; on communities; families; and individual lives. The module will provide participants with the opportunity to explore ALLN as an academic field and as an area of rapidly expanding policy interest. Through engagement with theories and concepts about ALLN participants will develop critical awareness of specific issues within their own professional settings.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000‐word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Philosophy of Education: Values, Aims And Society
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-Face
TERM(S) Autumn (October - December)
DAY/TIME Thursdays, 17:30 – 20:30
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module draws on work in ethics and political philosophy in order to provide an introduction to many of the major issues in philosophy of education. Specifically, we will explore philosophical aspects of the concepts of: freedom and equality; the perceived tension between these concepts in political philosophy; and the educational ideas associated with different ways of thinking about individual freedom, social justice and equality. These will be considered in relation to differing conceptions of ethics, and the divergent ideas of human being (the self and its relation to society) that these generate. We will also address the relevance of ideas and debates within these areas for current issues in educational policy and practice. Topics will include: social change and the advent of progressivism; arguments around progressivism and liberal education; liberalism and communitarianism; radical and libertarian traditions; the public/private distinction; privatization and marketisation; state control of education; faith schools and common schools; values education and education for citizenship.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Rights and Education
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face
TERM(S) Spring (January - March)
DAY/TIME Mondays, 17:30 – 20:30
MODULE DESCRIPTION The overall aim of this module is to explore conceptions of rights and equality and to consider how these apply to the context of education. We look at human, universal and absolute rights; equality of opportunity and outcome; equality in education and equality in the workplace; at the justification of such practices as positive discrimination and giving priority to the worse off; and at the right to education on the part of such groups as prisoners and migrants. We will be examining the relation between rights, equality and social justice, and we will explore the implications for educational policy and practice.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Second Language Acquisition
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face
TERM(S) Spring (January-March)
DAY/TIME To be confirmed
MODULE DESCRIPTION The aim of this module is to provide a general introduction to theories and approaches in second language acquisition. Various theoretical and empirical issues in the field are discussed together with learner-internal and learner-external factors that influence the course of second language development. In particular, the module provides students with an understanding of cognitive-interactionist and frequency-based perspectives of SLA; and the roles of learner factors such as age, first language, and individual difference variables. The module also explores how SLA theory and research may be applied to aspects of second language teaching, and how the use of technology may facilitate second language learning processes.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by a 5000-word written assignment or research report.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT Ortega, L. (2009). Understanding second language acquisition. Hodder Arnold.

 

Social Policy: Theory, Practice and Research - mixed mode
MODE(S) of delivery Mixed mode
TERM(S) Autumn (October-December)
DAY/TIME Introductory activity - Monday 26 Oct – Sunday 1 Nov 2015 Online (Moodle). Rest of the module, 5 workshops face-to-face.
MODULE DESCRIPTION
This module provides research-led teaching on social policy in theory and practice. It combines an advanced overview of the theoretical base of the field with a range of real world examples drawn from different policy settings in the UK and other countries. Particular attention is drawn to the role of research evidence in policy processes, from conception through to implementation and evaluation. The module starts off by looking at key concepts, models and theories of policy-making, such as redistribution, citizenship, and so on. It then moves on to illustrate them by examining policy-making across different policy sectors, such as education, health and social care. Policy initiatives examined in each case study will be chosen to highlight particular concepts and debates. We then go on to examine in greater detail the theory and practice of using research and analysis to inform social policy choices and decisions, including looking at different methods of measuring and evaluating research uptake and impact.
 
The main aims of the module are to:
Build students' substantive content knowledge and critical understanding of: competing theoretical and conceptual frameworks used in social policy analysis; different social policies adopted in the UK and other countries; the role of research evidence within policy processes; and key themes, issues and debates relating to the study of research use.
Provide students with a sound base from which to develop a substantive area of interest in later parts of the programme, where they will apply what they have learnt in an independent project focused on a topic of their choice.
This is the core module for the MSc Social Policy and Social Research programme, and is delivered in five workshops over the autumn term. It can also be taken by students on other programmes, or as a short course without MSc credit.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000‐word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Distance Learning or Study in London

Education and Development in Asia
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face, Online
TERM(S) Autumn (October - December) - Face-to-face; Summer (April - July) - online
DAY/TIME Face-to-face module: Thursdays 17.30 – 20.30 / Online: 10 weeks from beginning of summer term
MODULE DESCRIPTION We will examine the relationship between education (primarily at the level of schooling), state formation and patterns of economic growth in selected Asian countries and regions. It will be informed by a critique of various concepts of `development`, and will focus in particular on controversies relating to the significance of trends such as globalisation, and national and cultural identity in the developing world. While it will feature discussion of the relationship between education and economic development, the conceptualization of 'development' adopted here will extend beyond a concern with GDP and poverty reduction, to broader considerations of the role of education in the search for Asian models of 'modernity'. Key themes will include the role of skills formation strategies in the East Asian 'Economic Miracle', the contribution of education to nation-building and identity formation, and the implications of globalisation (both cultural and economic) for education policy in Asia. A particular focus will be the tension in education policies in East and South Asia and elsewhere between an elitist pursuit of high skills seen as crucial to competitiveness in the 'global knowledge economy', and the promotion and improvement of formal education for the masses with a view to fostering greater equality of opportunity and 'social cohesion'. Dangers inherent in the relationship between education (particularly schooling) and nationalism in East and South Asia are another major theme.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Education and International Development: concepts, theories and issues
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face and online
TERM(S) Face-to-face: Spring (January - March) or Summer (Intense); Online: Autumn/Spring (October - March)
DAY/TIME October - December: Tuesday evenings 17:15 - 20:15pm; January - March: Thursday evenings 17:15 - 20:15; October - March: online over twenty weeks ; Summer (intensive)
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module introduces a range of concepts from the social and political sciences that assist the understanding and analysis of the relationship between education, learning and international development in low and middle income countries. The module also explores critically the changing links between these relationships at individual, local, national, regional, international and global levels. It introduces and discusses issues of educational policy and practice in low and middle income countries.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Gender, Education and Development
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face and Online
TERM(S) Autumn: Face-to-face (October - December): Spring/Summer: Online - over 15 weeks (January to April): Summer: Face-to-face (intensive) (April - May)
DAY/TIME Face-to-face October - December: 10 weekly evening sessions 17:15 – 20:15; or two intensive blocks of three days between April and May (attendance at all 6 days required); or online January - April
MODULE DESCRIPTION This module aims to link work in education and international development with insights from gender and education and relate these to educational policy and practice. It is designed to develop an understanding of the circumstances in low and middle income countries, under which gender affects rights to, rights in and rights through education. The course looks at the gendered dimensions of processes of teaching and learning. It considers sexual divisions in education and the gendered political economy of family, work, political action and cultural production. Particular attention is given to gender and violence in school settings. Throughout the course there will be a concern to explore gender sensitive strategies and alternative approaches in education to overcome social division and inequalities.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Planning for Education and Development
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face and Online
TERM(S) Face-to-face: Autumn (October - December) and Spring term (January – March); Online: Spring (January - June)
DAY/TIME Face-to-face: Autumn term: Thursday 14:00 - 17:00; Spring term: 17:15 - 20:15
MODULE DESCRIPTION The module provides an international perspective on collaborative education planning, governance and administration within and between non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and inter-governmental organisations (IGOs; bi-lateral agencies), the private sector, and governments. It considers conflicting demands on education and ways to put new ideas into action, working from an examination of how decisions are made, to how they are implemented. Dilemmas regarding resource allocation and dealing with corruption and violence are explored. In two problem-based case studies at the end of the module, participants look at significant contemporary issues and possible education planning approaches. This module focuses on low and middle income countries only. Students should be aware of this before joining the module, and be able to bring experience / knowledge of low and middle income country contexts.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000-word assignment.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Professionalism and Expertise: Theories and Perspectives
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face and online
TERM(S) Autumn (October-December)
DAY/TIME Wednesdays 17:00 – 20:00
MODULE DESCRIPTION The issue of expertise is increasingly cited in literature on professionalism in the private and public sector as the hallmark of outstanding individual and team performance. This module enables participants to explore the concept of expertise across public and private sectors, nationally and internationally and in a range of professional contexts. It does this by taking a range of perspectives, for example, Cultural Anthropology, Philosophy, Psychology and Sociology, to enable participants to engage in debates about the purpose of professional education. The module has been designed to provide professionals with responsibility for managing, delivering or supporting education and training with opportunities to develop their own analysis and practice in what is a constantly changing economic, social, technological and policy environment.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by 5000‐word essay.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

Sociology of Education
MODE(S) of delivery Face-to-face and Online
TERM(S) Autumn (October - December)
DAY/TIME Wednesday, 17:30 – 20:30pm
MODULE DESCRIPTION The sociology of education offers many insights into the relationship between education and the state, society, and the individual. This module brings together a team of sociology of education experts in a range of areas to explore pressing contemporary issues and perspectives in this exciting and diverse field. The module explores the application of a range of sociological theories to issues such as globalisation, marketization, neo-liberalism, educational governance, identity, subjectivity, forms of resistance and more. Special attention is paid to educational inequalities, inclusion/exclusion and issues of social justice and possibilities for social transformations. We explore various axes of power, identity and institutional organisation including sessions focused on social class, race, ethnicity, culture, gender, sexuality, disability, migration and citizenship. Over the course of the module we will explore how the work of selected research in the sociology of education can help us to better understand these educational issues and how we might respond to them.
ASSESSMENT This module is assessed formally through a 5000-word essay. Formative assessments will be in the form of short mini-presentations by students in pairs or threes at the weekly seminars; and a poster presentation on the final afternoon of the module.
SPECIAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS N/A
CORE TEXT N/A

 

You can also download a copy of all module descriptions.

Study materials

Online support

Most of your study materials are provided electronically through the Virtual Learning Environment (Moodle), including individual module handbooks and digitised readings. There will be online tasks to complete and opportunities to discuss your work with your fellow students and your tutors.

You also take part in live online lectures which you can record and play back at a convenient time. Working collaboratively with colleagues online is an important feature of how you learn, enabling you to compare experiences in a range of locations and cultures and acquire group working and technical skills.

How you study

The programme is highly flexible, allowing you to select optional modules from different thematic areas to reflect your professional interests and needs. You can study full or part time so that you can balance your study with other commitments. We estimate that you need to study for about 10-15 hours a week for each module. You can study in the UK or wherever you live in the world. 

The first compulsory module, 'What is Education?', runs in two formats. The module is available from July to September each year with a two week intensive course at the Institute of Education (held at the end of July). An alternative version is available from October to December, with weekly lectures held over a ten-week period.  You can study this fully online or in mixed mode (a combination of face-to-face and online study). The module features seminars and keynote lectures from eminent academics, and enables you to meet IOE academics and your fellow students.

The second compulsory module, 'Understanding Research', runs in the autumn (October to December) and in the spring (January to March) and is taught fully online.

You can study the two optional modules face-to-face, by distance learning, or mixed mode.

We recommend that you allow two terms to complete your dissertation

What is a typical programme of study?

As most students are studying and working at the same time, a typical study programme would be:

Summer 2015 (July to September) 'What is Education?' (first compulsory module)
Autumn 2015 (October to December) First optional module (to be agreed with Programme Director)
Spring 2016 (January to March) 'Understanding Research' (second compulsory module)
Summer 2016 (April to June) Second optional module 
Autumn 2016 and Spring 2017 Dissertation module (takes at least two terms)

UCL Institute of Education library

UCL Institude of Education library, the largest education library in Europe, has an extensive collection of e-resources. MA in Education students have full access to the library and are supported to become advanced library users. For the distance learning modules, digitised resources are available to download. 

 

 

Fees

Fees

The fees below refer to the 2016-2017 academic year only and are effective from 1 March 2016. Fees are subject to annual review.

Academic Year2016-17
Registration fee£ 915
Fee per module£ 1,850
Fee for dissertation £ 3,590
Total MA£ 11,905
Total per Individual module (taken on a stand-alone basis)£ 2,130
ConvertGBP x 1

Disclaimer: the currency conversion tool is provided to you for convenience only and does not constitute an endorsement or approval by the University of London; the exchange rates are provided dynamically via a third-party source, consequently, the University of London International Programmes is not responsible for their accuracy.

When to pay

Fees may be paid in one of two ways:

  • Either pay the total fee on registration by making a single payment, this covers the registration fee and all module fees.
  • Or if you prefer to spread out your payments, pay the registration fee plus the fee for each module you want to take in the first year and in following years pay the fee for each new module you take.

How to pay

All University fees must be paid in pounds sterling (GBP). The University accepts:

  • Western Union - Quick Pay.
  • Credit/debit card (Visa, MasterCard, Maestro, Electron, JCB).
  • Sterling banker's draft/cheque.
  • International money/postal order.

Further details are given in payment methods.

Notes

The University reserves the right to amend previously announced fees, if necessary.

Fees for the UCL Institute of Education face-to-face version of this programme are available on the IOE website

Assessment

This degree is assessed entirely by coursework. The coursework requirement will vary for individual modules, but will make up a significant part of the module content and will be submitted at the end of the module, normally via the VLE.

The deadline for submission of coursework will depend on which modules you select but is normally within 60 days of the end of the module. Students are normally given an opportunity for formative feedback on their coursework which may be in the form of comments on an essay draft (or part draft). Details of assessment for each module are available in the module descriptions.

Requirements

Academic Requirements

  • An undergraduate degree (e.g. bachelor) which is considered at least comparable to a UK second class honours degree, in any subject, from an institution acceptable to the University.

Please note we accept qualifications from around the world. For further guidance please see our UCL Institute of Education Qualifications for Entrance.

Note that some option modules may have additional entry requirements. Please refer to the individual module descriptions in the MA in Education module outlines for further guidance.

If you do not meet the entrance requirement you may still apply. Each application will be considered on an individual basis by the Programme Director.

Work experience

There is no minimum work experience requirement for entry to this programme. However, some option modules may have additional entry requirements (see above).

Language requirements

You will meet the English language requirement if you have passed, within the past three years:

  • (IELTS) International English Language Testing System when an overall score of at least 7.0 is achieved with a minimum of 6.5 on the Reading sub-test and 6.0 in the Written sub-test.

Computer Requirements

You must have regular access to a computer (or mobile device*) with an internet connection to use the University of London International Programmes website and the Student Portal. These are where your programme’s study resources are located. Through the Student Portal you can register as a student, enter exams and use your programme’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The VLE provides you with electronic learning materials, access to the University of London Online Library, networking opportunities, and other resources.

To get the most from your studies, your computer should have at least the following minimum specification: 

  • a web browser (the latest version of Firefox, Chrome or Internet Explorer). This must accept cookies and have JavaScript enabled
  • screen resolution of 1024 x 768 or greater
  • sufficient bandwidth to download documents of at least 2 MB

and the following applications installed:

  • a word processor that reads Microsoft Word format (.doc)
  • Adobe, or other pdf reader.

* Full mobile access is not available for all programmes.

Academic leaders

Academic leadership: UCL Institute of Education

UCL Institute of Education is the largest institution in the UK devoted to the study of education and related areas. Founded in 1902, the Institute is a world-class centre of excellence for teacher training, higher degrees, research and consultancy in education and related areas of professional practice and the social sciences.

Academic leaders

Dr Clare Brooks, Programme Director, MA Education

Clare is a Senior Lecturer in Education. She has had over 12 years' experience working with teachers and student teachers and has led a variety of programmes in education.

A former London geography teacher, Clare’s background is in geography education. Her research has explored how teachers use their subject knowledge, and the idea of “expertise” in education. She is a Chartered Geographer, has been nominated Honorary Secretary of the International Geographical Union-Commission for Geography Education, and is a founding member of GEReCo (Geography Education Research Collective).

Read an interview with Clare in our online magazine, London Connection.

Apply online

MA in Education flyer

Download the MA Education flyer [PDF]

MA in Education modules

Download a listing of the modules offered on the MA in Education [PDF] in the 2016-17 academic year.

Share Institute of Education (IOE) expertise

Read expert commentary on education and related areas of social science in the IOE London blog.

Student blog

Read blog posts by MA in Education students.

Current MA in Education student Deema Ghata-Aura Gaining a global understanding
The Institute of Education's academic reputation coupled with the flexibility of the MA in Education proved decisive for Deema Ghata-Aura

Current MA Education student Ellen Bretherton Profile on: Ellen Bretherton
Looking to further her professional development while remaining in full-time work, Ellen Bretherton finds the MA in Education a perfect fit

MA in Education overview

The Institute of Education's Dr Clare Brooks provides an overview of the MA in Education.

What drives effective education in the 21st century?

Chris Husbands, Director of the IOE and Professor of Education, shares his views on what drives effective education in the 21st century.