Laws, undergraduate (LLB and CertHE Common Law)

Overview

Study for a Bachelor of Laws (LLB) degree of international standing as an independent or locally supported learner

This programme is ideal for you if:

  • You're looking to obtain an LLB degree of international standing which has provided the first step on a career route for many thousands of practising lawyers worldwide.
  • You wish to develop a critical awareness of the common law legal tradition and be able to apply analytical and problem-solving skills in a range of legal and non-legal settings.
  • You want to enhance key skills of communication, information literacy, analysis and argument.

Note: if you intend to practise as a lawyer, barrister or solicitor, we strongly recommend that you check the requirements of the professional body in the jurisdiction in which you wish to practise before committing yourself to the degree.

Key dates
LLB application deadline 1 October in the year before you intend to sit your first examinations
LLB registration deadline 30 November in the year before you intend to sit your examinations
CertHE Common Law registration deadline 31 October in the year before you intend to sit your examinations 
Examinations take place May/June

Programme aims and values

The Laws Programme is committed to:

  • Offering expert guidance in law. Our study materials are informed by current research and scholarship and engage with contemporary legal issues. Students are offered the opportunity not only to know the law but to understand it.
  • Providing a wealth of resources. With our Online Library and Laws Virtual Learning Environment, you have a resource-rich learning environment in which to develop your legal research skills.
  • Promoting independent learning. We support you in developing your capacity to manage your own learning.

By studying with us you will:

  • Acquire knowledge and understanding of the foundation subjects of Common Law.
  • Learn to analyse and critically evaluate legal and non-legal primary and secondary materials.
  • Develop critical awareness. You will learn how to stand back and consider the ‘bigger picture’, developing an awareness of the context of law, nationally and globally.

Prestige and career progression

In a world where degree providers are proliferating, the University of London’s LLB offers the security of an internationally recognised 'gold standard' established for over 100 years. The University of London was the first to offer a degree in English Law, in the 1890s. Upon graduation you will be joining a distinguished group of solicitors, barristers and judges around the world who began their careers by obtaining their law degree through the University of London International Programmes.

The academic direction of the LLB and CertHE Common Law is provided by a Consortium of outstanding University of London Law Schools: Birkbeck, King's, LSE, Queen Mary, SOAS and UCL. Four of these Colleges (UCL, King’s, LSE, and Queen Mary) are ranked in the top 50 worldwide for law, and all are ranked in the top 20 in the UK for law (QS World Rankings 2016).

Flexible study at a reasonable cost

You have 3-8 years to complete the LLB (or a minimum of two years on Graduate Entry) and 1-5 years to complete the CertHE Common Law. Fees are payable as you progress rather than as a single lump.

The following are examples of University fees for the whole programme of study: for the LLB from £3,111 for Graduate Entry students studying over two years to £4,473 for Standard Entry students studying over four years, and £1,632 for the CertHE Common Law for students studying over one year only (you will also need to pay fees to the teaching institution).

Please note that these examples are calculated using current fees for 2016-17 and do not reflect any annual changes. Further details of fees payable to the University are provided on the Fees page.

What our students say

María Belén Bastone, Argentina

María Belén Bastone, Argentina"Studying with the University of London International Programmes has been an exceptional and highly recommended experience. It offered me the opportunity to achieve an LLB degree while having a job and continuing my studies to get another degree in my own country. It has been a mind-opening experience for me, which certainly enriched me both personally and professionally."

María Belén completed her University of London LLB in 2013 and graduated as an Attorney at Law in Argentina with First Class Honours in 2015. She is a Junior Associate at the internationally recognised law firm Baker & McKenzie, and also Academic Director of the LLB programme at AIE, the University of London’s registered centre in Argentina.

 

Structure

Structure and syllabus

Note: Prospective students should read the Programme Specification and the Programme Regulations for information and rules regarding registration as a LLB student as there are rules that govern what modules may be chosen and the order in which they are studied.

Standard Entry Route - Qualifying Law Degree (LLB)

Level 4 – Four compulsory modules

Contract law

This module places its emphasis on understanding the key underlying principles of English law, covering the core topics, including formation of contracts, capacity to contract and privity, performance and breach of contract and remedies for breach of contract.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Criminal law

This module examines general principles of criminal liability, a range of fatal and non-fatal offences against the person and selected offences against property. Attempts to commit offences, secondary liability and defences also form part of the curriculum.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Legal system and method

This introduction to the English legal system seeks to convey what is distinctive about the common law approach as a legal methodology. The module is vital in initiating students into the process of legal research and the understanding of legal reasoning.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

[Registration with the Online Library is a requirement for successfully completing this course.]

Public law

Focusing upon constitutional issues and reform, students will analyse key issues governing the relation between citizens and the state, including sovereignty and the division of powers between legislature, executive and administration.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Level 5 – Three compulsory modules

Equity and Trusts

Equity and Trusts deals with the rules and principles governing the creation and operation of trusts (including express trusts, trusts arising as a matter of law and breach of trust), fiduciary relationships and equitable remedies.

Download the full module descriptor. [PDF]

EU law

Appealing to students who enjoy public law or who have an interest in public affairs, politics, economics or international relations, the module examines EU institutions and law-making powers as well as the key questions of the impact of EU law on national law and its overall consequences for business enterprises and individuals.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Tort law

The module introduces students to the organising principles of tort law, such as damage, fault and vicarious liability. Students will explore each element of the cause of action in a negligence claim, with particular emphasis on the duty of care concept. The module builds on the duty of care concept to develop students’ knowledge and understanding of principles of liability governing pure economic loss, psychiatric harm and liability of public authorities. The module also explores those torts aimed at the safe and quiet enjoyment of land and protection of reputation.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Level 5 - One optional module chosen from

Administrative law

Administrative law is a hugely expanding field and its core purpose is to ensure that any decisions or actions taken by government are lawful and, when they are not, to provide redress for grievances. The module will appeal to students who enjoy public law and have an interest in public affairs.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Commercial law

Commercial law is concerned with obligations between parties to commercial transactions and the relationship with rules of personal property. Emphasis is placed on both knowledge of principles and the ability to apply the rules of law to achieve practical solutions to practical problems. Students will become familiar with a range of issues including: ownership of or title to goods; transfers of title and the effect on third parties; passing of property between buyer and seller.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Family law

Family law affects every member of society. Modern legal regulation of family relationships involves a complex relation between the family and the state. Marriage, divorce and the legal status of offspring are intertwined with questions of financial provision, child welfare and wider public policy issues.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

International protection of human rights

This module concerns the protection afforded to individuals under international law and examines fundamental concepts, principles, theories and philosophies underpinning the law of international human rights, as well as the mechanisms enforcing and monitoring these rights.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Level 6 – Two compulsory modules

Jurisprudence and legal theory

Jurisprudence poses fundamental questions about the nature of law, its place in society and how a legal system operates as a system of rules and as a social institution engaging with ideals of justice and often conflicting moral codes.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Property law

Property law centres on the concept of the nature of the various interests that can exist in land, the principles governing the creation, transfer and extinction of these interests and the extent to which those interests are enforceable against third parties.

Download the full module descriptor

Level 6 – Two optional modules chosen from

Civil and criminal procedure

This module will focus on the procedural rules and processes that govern the conduct of criminal and civil legal actions. Students of this module will be expected to compare and contrast civil and criminal procedure and will need to have knowledge of the court system and the way in which civil and criminal justice is organised and dispensed.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Company law

A vital module for anyone intending to operate in a commercial field, the syllabus centres on the way the law regulates companies and the facilities that company law offers, such as limited liability and transferability of shares, as well as corresponding burdens such as duties of disclosure and compliance with statutory procedures.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Conflict of laws

Also known as private international law, this is the body of rules applied by the English courts to cases with a foreign element, dealing with core issues of jurisdiction, substantive decision- making and recognition of the laws of other jurisdictions.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Criminology

Criminology examines, from a range of political, sociological, psychological and philosophical points of view, the relationship between the individual who breaks the laws of the state and the state’s power to lay down laws and punish those who transgress them.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Evidence

The law of evidence governs what evidence may be presented and contested in the courtroom, techniques for eliciting evidence and the role of the lawyers, jury and judge in an adversarial system. Highly relevant to actual day-to- day legal practice, this module will appeal particularly to students intending to become courtroom lawyers.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Intellectual property

The law of intellectual property rights seeks a difficult balance between rewarding the right owner of a piece of intellectual property, and the needs of society to gain access to scientific, technological or cultural benefits. It includes copyright, patent and trade mark law with particular emphasis on English law.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Introduction to Islamic law

The module offers an overview of Islamic law, and addresses first the religious and historical foundations of Islamic law before going on to address its application in contemporary jurisdictions.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Labour law

Of appeal to anyone interested in industrial relations, this module relates both to individuals in their workplace and the operation of the labour market in general. The module covers not only individual matters (such as employment contracts, unfair dismissal, redundancy, sex and race discrimination) but also ‘collective’ labour law – including trade union ‘recognition’, the law relating to trade disputes and the protections given to workers who choose to join a trade union.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Laws Dissertation

The Dissertation offers final-year students the opportunity to undertake in-depth legal/socio-legal research. Students design their own research question and submit a proposal online on a topic they have not previously (or concurrently) studied in depth. The dissertation option will be examined by a) an electronic submission of a 10,000 word dissertation, and b) a viva examination.

Full module descriptor update is pending.

Public international law

Public international law concerns legal relations between states but also deals with the role of the UN and other international organisations and, in the fields of human rights and international criminal law, the rights and duties of individuals.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Standard Entry Route - Non Qualifying Law Degree (LLB)

Level 4 – Four compulsory modules

Contract law

This module places its emphasis on understanding the key underlying principles of English law, covering the core topics, including formation of contracts, capacity to contract and privity, performance and breach of contract and remedies for breach of contract.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Criminal law

This module examines general principles of criminal liability, a range of fatal and non-fatal offences against the person and selected offences against property. Attempts to commit offences, secondary liability and defences also form part of the curriculum.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Legal system and method

This introduction to the English legal system seeks to convey what is distinctive about the common law approach as a legal methodology. The module is vital in initiating students into the process of legal research and the understanding of legal reasoning.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

[Registration with the Online Library is a requirement for successfully completing this course.]

Public law

Focusing upon constitutional issues and reform, students will analyse key issues governing the relation between citizens and the state, including sovereignty and the division of powers between legislature, executive and administration.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Level 5 - One complusory module

Tort law

The module introduces students to the organising principles of tort law, such as damage, fault and vicarious liability. Students will explore each element of the cause of action in a negligence claim, with particular emphasis on the duty of care concept. The module builds on the duty of care concept to develop students’ knowledge and understanding of principles of liability governing pure economic loss, psychiatric harm and liability of public authorities. The module also explores those torts aimed at the safe and quiet enjoyment of land and protection of reputation.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Level 5 - Three optional modules chosen from

Administrative law

Administrative law is a hugely expanding field and its core purpose is to ensure that any decisions or actions taken by government are lawful and, when they are not, to provide redress for grievances. The module will appeal to students who enjoy public law and have an interest in public affairs.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Commercial law

Commercial law is concerned with obligations between parties to commercial transactions and the relationship with rules of personal property. Emphasis is placed on both knowledge of principles and the ability to apply the rules of law to achieve practical solutions to practical problems. Students will become familiar with a range of issues including: ownership of or title to goods; transfers of title and the effect on third parties; passing of property between buyer and seller.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Equity and Trusts

Equity and Trusts deals with the rules and principles governing the creation and operation of trusts (including express trusts, trusts arising as a matter of law and breach of trust), fiduciary relationships and equitable remedies.

Download the full module descriptor. [PDF]

EU law

Appealing to students who enjoy public law or who have an interest in public affairs, politics, economics or international relations, the module examines EU institutions and law-making powers as well as the key questions of the impact of EU law on national law and its overall consequences for business enterprises and individuals.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Family law

Family law affects every member of society. Modern legal regulation of family relationships involves a complex relation between the family and the state. Marriage, divorce and the legal status of offspring are intertwined with questions of financial provision, child welfare and wider public policy issues.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

International protection of human rights

This module concerns the protection afforded to individuals under international law and examines fundamental concepts, principles, theories and philosophies underpinning the law of international human rights, as well as the mechanisms enforcing and monitoring these rights.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Level 6 – One compulsory module

Jurisprudence and legal theory

Jurisprudence poses fundamental questions about the nature of law, its place in society and how a legal system operates as a system of rules and as a social institution engaging with ideals of justice and often conflicting moral codes.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Level 6 – Three optional modules chosen from

Civil and criminal procedure

This module will focus on the procedural rules and processes that govern the conduct of criminal and civil legal actions. Students of this module will be expected to compare and contrast civil and criminal procedure and will need to have knowledge of the court system and the way in which civil and criminal justice is organised and dispensed.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Company law

A vital module for anyone intending to operate in a commercial field, the syllabus centres on the way the law regulates companies and the facilities that company law offers, such as limited liability and transferability of shares, as well as corresponding burdens such as duties of disclosure and compliance with statutory procedures.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Conflict of laws

Also known as private international law, this is the body of rules applied by the English courts to cases with a foreign element, dealing with core issues of jurisdiction, substantive decision- making and recognition of the laws of other jurisdictions.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Criminology

Criminology examines, from a range of political, sociological, psychological and philosophical points of view, the relationship between the individual who breaks the laws of the state and the state’s power to lay down laws and punish those who transgress them.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Evidence

The law of evidence governs what evidence may be presented and contested in the courtroom, techniques for eliciting evidence and the role of the lawyers, jury and judge in an adversarial system. Highly relevant to actual day-to- day legal practice, this module will appeal particularly to students intending to become courtroom lawyers.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Intellectual property

The law of intellectual property rights seeks a difficult balance between rewarding the right owner of a piece of intellectual property, and the needs of society to gain access to scientific, technological or cultural benefits. It includes copyright, patent and trade mark law with particular emphasis on English law.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Introduction to Islamic law

The module offers an overview of Islamic law, and addresses first the religious and historical foundations of Islamic law before going on to address its application in contemporary jurisdictions.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Labour law

Of appeal to anyone interested in industrial relations, this module relates both to individuals in their workplace and the operation of the labour market in general. The module covers not only individual matters (such as employment contracts, unfair dismissal, redundancy, sex and race discrimination) but also ‘collective’ labour law – including trade union ‘recognition’, the law relating to trade disputes and the protections given to workers who choose to join a trade union.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Laws Dissertation

The Dissertation offers final-year students the opportunity to undertake in-depth legal/socio-legal research. Students design their own research question and submit a proposal online on a topic they have not previously (or concurrently) studied in depth. The dissertation option will be examined by a) an electronic submission of a 10,000 word dissertation, and b) a viva examination.

Full module descriptor update is pending.

Property law

Property law centres on the concept of the nature of the various interests that can exist in land, the principles governing the creation, transfer and extinction of these interests and the extent to which those interests are enforceable against third parties.

Download the full module descriptor

Public international law

Public international law concerns legal relations between states but also deals with the role of the UN and other international organisations and, in the fields of human rights and international criminal law, the rights and duties of individuals.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Graduate Entry Route - Qualifying Law Degree (LLB)

All Graduate Entry students will be required to take Law skills for graduates (LA1050) upon first registration.

Level 4 – Three compulsory modules

Contract law

This module places its emphasis on understanding the key underlying principles of English law, covering the core topics, including formation of contracts, capacity to contract and privity, performance and breach of contract and remedies for breach of contract.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Criminal law

This module examines general principles of criminal liability, a range of fatal and non-fatal offences against the person and selected offences against property. Attempts to commit offences, secondary liability and defences also form part of the curriculum.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Public law

Focusing upon constitutional issues and reform, students will analyse key issues governing the relation between citizens and the state, including sovereignty and the division of powers between legislature, executive and administration.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Level 5 – Three compulsory modules

Equity and Trusts

Equity and Trusts deals with the rules and principles governing the creation and operation of trusts (including express trusts, trusts arising as a matter of law and breach of trust), fiduciary relationships and equitable remedies.

Download the full module descriptor. [PDF]

EU law

Appealing to students who enjoy public law or who have an interest in public affairs, politics, economics or international relations, the module examines EU institutions and law-making powers as well as the key questions of the impact of EU law on national law and its overall consequences for business enterprises and individuals.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Tort law

The module introduces students to the organising principles of tort law, such as damage, fault and vicarious liability. Students will explore each element of the cause of action in a negligence claim, with particular emphasis on the duty of care concept. The module builds on the duty of care concept to develop students’ knowledge and understanding of principles of liability governing pure economic loss, psychiatric harm and liability of public authorities. The module also explores those torts aimed at the safe and quiet enjoyment of land and protection of reputation.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Level 6 – Two compulsory modules

Jurisprudence and legal theory

Jurisprudence poses fundamental questions about the nature of law, its place in society and how a legal system operates as a system of rules and as a social institution engaging with ideals of justice and often conflicting moral codes.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Property law

Property law centres on the concept of the nature of the various interests that can exist in land, the principles governing the creation, transfer and extinction of these interests and the extent to which those interests are enforceable against third parties.

Download the full module descriptor

Level 6 – One optional module chosen from

Civil and criminal procedure

This module will focus on the procedural rules and processes that govern the conduct of criminal and civil legal actions. Students of this module will be expected to compare and contrast civil and criminal procedure and will need to have knowledge of the court system and the way in which civil and criminal justice is organised and dispensed.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Company law

A vital module for anyone intending to operate in a commercial field, the syllabus centres on the way the law regulates companies and the facilities that company law offers, such as limited liability and transferability of shares, as well as corresponding burdens such as duties of disclosure and compliance with statutory procedures.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Conflict of laws

Also known as private international law, this is the body of rules applied by the English courts to cases with a foreign element, dealing with core issues of jurisdiction, substantive decision- making and recognition of the laws of other jurisdictions.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Criminology

Criminology examines, from a range of political, sociological, psychological and philosophical points of view, the relationship between the individual who breaks the laws of the state and the state’s power to lay down laws and punish those who transgress them.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Evidence

The law of evidence governs what evidence may be presented and contested in the courtroom, techniques for eliciting evidence and the role of the lawyers, jury and judge in an adversarial system. Highly relevant to actual day-to- day legal practice, this module will appeal particularly to students intending to become courtroom lawyers.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Intellectual property

The law of intellectual property rights seeks a difficult balance between rewarding the right owner of a piece of intellectual property, and the needs of society to gain access to scientific, technological or cultural benefits. It includes copyright, patent and trade mark law with particular emphasis on English law.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Introduction to Islamic law

The module offers an overview of Islamic law, and addresses first the religious and historical foundations of Islamic law before going on to address its application in contemporary jurisdictions.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Labour law

Of appeal to anyone interested in industrial relations, this module relates both to individuals in their workplace and the operation of the labour market in general. The module covers not only individual matters (such as employment contracts, unfair dismissal, redundancy, sex and race discrimination) but also ‘collective’ labour law – including trade union ‘recognition’, the law relating to trade disputes and the protections given to workers who choose to join a trade union.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Laws Dissertation

The Dissertation offers final-year students the opportunity to undertake in-depth legal/socio-legal research. Students design their own research question and submit a proposal online on a topic they have not previously (or concurrently) studied in depth. The dissertation option will be examined by a) an electronic submission of a 10,000 word dissertation, and b) a viva examination.

Full module descriptor update is pending.

Public international law

Public international law concerns legal relations between states but also deals with the role of the UN and other international organisations and, in the fields of human rights and international criminal law, the rights and duties of individuals.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Graduate Entry Route - Non Qualifying Law Degree (LLB)

All Graduate Entry students will be required to take Law skills for graduates (LA1050) upon first registration.

Level 4 – Three compulsory modules

Contract law

This module places its emphasis on understanding the key underlying principles of English law, covering the core topics, including formation of contracts, capacity to contract and privity, performance and breach of contract and remedies for breach of contract.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Criminal law

This module examines general principles of criminal liability, a range of fatal and non-fatal offences against the person and selected offences against property. Attempts to commit offences, secondary liability and defences also form part of the curriculum.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Public law

Focusing upon constitutional issues and reform, students will analyse key issues governing the relation between citizens and the state, including sovereignty and the division of powers between legislature, executive and administration.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Level 5 - One complusory module

Tort law

The module introduces students to the organising principles of tort law, such as damage, fault and vicarious liability. Students will explore each element of the cause of action in a negligence claim, with particular emphasis on the duty of care concept. The module builds on the duty of care concept to develop students’ knowledge and understanding of principles of liability governing pure economic loss, psychiatric harm and liability of public authorities. The module also explores those torts aimed at the safe and quiet enjoyment of land and protection of reputation.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Level 5 - Two optional modules chosen from

Administrative law

Administrative law is a hugely expanding field and its core purpose is to ensure that any decisions or actions taken by government are lawful and, when they are not, to provide redress for grievances. The module will appeal to students who enjoy public law and have an interest in public affairs.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Commercial law

Commercial law is concerned with obligations between parties to commercial transactions and the relationship with rules of personal property. Emphasis is placed on both knowledge of principles and the ability to apply the rules of law to achieve practical solutions to practical problems. Students will become familiar with a range of issues including: ownership of or title to goods; transfers of title and the effect on third parties; passing of property between buyer and seller.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Equity and Trusts

Equity and Trusts deals with the rules and principles governing the creation and operation of trusts (including express trusts, trusts arising as a matter of law and breach of trust), fiduciary relationships and equitable remedies.

Download the full module descriptor. [PDF]

EU law

Appealing to students who enjoy public law or who have an interest in public affairs, politics, economics or international relations, the module examines EU institutions and law-making powers as well as the key questions of the impact of EU law on national law and its overall consequences for business enterprises and individuals.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Family law

Family law affects every member of society. Modern legal regulation of family relationships involves a complex relation between the family and the state. Marriage, divorce and the legal status of offspring are intertwined with questions of financial provision, child welfare and wider public policy issues.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

International protection of human rights

This module concerns the protection afforded to individuals under international law and examines fundamental concepts, principles, theories and philosophies underpinning the law of international human rights, as well as the mechanisms enforcing and monitoring these rights.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Level 6 – One compulsory module

Jurisprudence and legal theory

Jurisprudence poses fundamental questions about the nature of law, its place in society and how a legal system operates as a system of rules and as a social institution engaging with ideals of justice and often conflicting moral codes.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Level 6 – Two optional modules chosen from

Civil and criminal procedure

This module will focus on the procedural rules and processes that govern the conduct of criminal and civil legal actions. Students of this module will be expected to compare and contrast civil and criminal procedure and will need to have knowledge of the court system and the way in which civil and criminal justice is organised and dispensed.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Company law

A vital module for anyone intending to operate in a commercial field, the syllabus centres on the way the law regulates companies and the facilities that company law offers, such as limited liability and transferability of shares, as well as corresponding burdens such as duties of disclosure and compliance with statutory procedures.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Conflict of laws

Also known as private international law, this is the body of rules applied by the English courts to cases with a foreign element, dealing with core issues of jurisdiction, substantive decision- making and recognition of the laws of other jurisdictions.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Criminology

Criminology examines, from a range of political, sociological, psychological and philosophical points of view, the relationship between the individual who breaks the laws of the state and the state’s power to lay down laws and punish those who transgress them.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Evidence

The law of evidence governs what evidence may be presented and contested in the courtroom, techniques for eliciting evidence and the role of the lawyers, jury and judge in an adversarial system. Highly relevant to actual day-to- day legal practice, this module will appeal particularly to students intending to become courtroom lawyers.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Intellectual property

The law of intellectual property rights seeks a difficult balance between rewarding the right owner of a piece of intellectual property, and the needs of society to gain access to scientific, technological or cultural benefits. It includes copyright, patent and trade mark law with particular emphasis on English law.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Introduction to Islamic law

The module offers an overview of Islamic law, and addresses first the religious and historical foundations of Islamic law before going on to address its application in contemporary jurisdictions.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Labour law

Of appeal to anyone interested in industrial relations, this module relates both to individuals in their workplace and the operation of the labour market in general. The module covers not only individual matters (such as employment contracts, unfair dismissal, redundancy, sex and race discrimination) but also ‘collective’ labour law – including trade union ‘recognition’, the law relating to trade disputes and the protections given to workers who choose to join a trade union.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Laws Dissertation

The Dissertation offers final-year students the opportunity to undertake in-depth legal/socio-legal research. Students design their own research question and submit a proposal online on a topic they have not previously (or concurrently) studied in depth. The dissertation option will be examined by a) an electronic submission of a 10,000 word dissertation, and b) a viva examination.

Full module descriptor update is pending.

Property law

Property law centres on the concept of the nature of the various interests that can exist in land, the principles governing the creation, transfer and extinction of these interests and the extent to which those interests are enforceable against third parties.

Download the full module descriptor

Public international law

Public international law concerns legal relations between states but also deals with the role of the UN and other international organisations and, in the fields of human rights and international criminal law, the rights and duties of individuals.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Certificate of Higher Education in Common Law

Essential: To study the CertHE Common Law you must attend a recognised centre which is listed on the Institutions Directory.

Compulsory modules

Contract law

This module places its emphasis on understanding the key underlying principles of English law, covering the core topics, including formation of contracts, capacity to contract and privity, performance and breach of contract and remedies for breach of contract.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Criminal law

This module examines general principles of criminal liability, a range of fatal and non-fatal offences against the person and selected offences against property. Attempts to commit offences, secondary liability and defences also form part of the curriculum.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Legal system and method

This introduction to the English legal system seeks to convey what is distinctive about the common law approach as a legal methodology. The module is vital in initiating students into the process of legal research and the understanding of legal reasoning.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

[Registration with the Online Library is a requirement for successfully completing this course.]

Public law

Focusing upon constitutional issues and reform, students will analyse key issues governing the relation between citizens and the state, including sovereignty and the division of powers between legislature, executive and administration.

Download the full module descriptor [PDF].

Study materials

How you study

You receive specially designed learning materials and have access to a significant array of online resources. Please note that online access is a requirement for registration to the LLB and the Certificate of Higher Education in Common Law. The cost of your materials is included in your initial and continuing registration fees.

The study materials are designed to guide you through the syllabus for each module and direct your reading of the prescribed textbooks, study packs and Online Library resources. Although all study materials are specially produced for self-directed learning, many students choose to pay for additional educational support through an independent teaching institution either full time or part time, and benefit from the more formalised support this provides. CertHE Common Law students must have registered through, and be studying at, a teaching institution that has been specifically recognised for this purpose by the University of London.

You are strongly advised to apply to us and wait for confirmation that you are eligible to register before enrolling with an institution. Enrolment with an institution does not mean that a student is automatically registered with the University.

Study materials include:

  • Subject Guides. These are provided for each module you study. The guide will take you systematically through the module topics, with instructions on reading, learning activities (with feedback) and guidance on answering sample examination questions. The subject guides for the Level 4 compulsory modules are provided on the website.
  • Study Packs. Key recommended readings in the subject guides are available online.
  • Statute books. These are provided for all modules where a statute book is permitted in the exam.
  • Student Guide. The Student Guide is produced for the benefit of all students. It includes information, advice and guidance on the different stages and different demands of the student life cycle. It will be a valuable point of reference throughout your studies.
  • Programme Specification and Regulations. These tell you about programme structures, how to enter for exams, marking schemes, transfers etc., and are provided in electronic format.
  • For further information on essential reading, further reading, statute books and casebooks for each module please see the Booklist 2016-2017 [pdf: 30pgs 656KB].

Study support and online resources 

  • Laws VLE - The password protected Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) provides a centralised location for accessing many resources including: electronic versions of your study materials; past examination papers; online audio and video lectures; module updates and discussion forums.
  • Online legal research exercises - Designed to build and enhance your ability to find primary and secondary legal materials using electronic sources, and to conduct legal research generally.
  • Online Library - Gives access to Justis.com, JSTOR, ABI/INFORM, Lexis® Library, Westlaw, Academic Search Complete, Business Search Premier, and Casetrack.
  • The Laws Blog helps you to stay in touch with what is happening on your programme and includes key events and developments throughout the year.
  • Regional Revision Courses – These courses are taught by University of London approved tutors and offer support to students around the world preparing for examinations. They are an excellent opportunity to meet other students on the programme and to focus on important areas of study within each module. The events are hosted over four days with two different modules taught each day. Dates and further information is available Undergraduate Laws webpages and students are invited to book in advance.
Fees

Fees

The fees below refer to the 2016-2017 session only and are effective from 1 March 2016.

LLB and CertHE Common Law2016-2017
Application fee (LLB only)(non-refundable)£ 84
Registration fee£ 816
Continuing registration fee£ 375
Examination fee per 30 credit module£ 204
Credit transfer/Accreditation of prior learning fee (per module)£ 45
Full year’s transfer fee (Credit transfer/Accreditation of prior learning)(3 or 4 modules)£ 180
Laws Dissertation£ 358*
Laws Skills Portfolio£ 204*
Individual modules2016-2017
Application fee (non-refundable)£ 84
Application fee for presently registered LLB students (non-refundable) £ 42
Individual module fee (includes an examination attempt) £ 408
Extension of registration fee (per annum, per Individual module)£ 204
Re-sit fee (for one paper)£ 204
Other fees (where applicable)
Late registration fee**£ 100
ConvertGBP x 1

Disclaimer: the currency conversion tool is provided to you for convenience only and does not constitute an endorsement or approval by the University of London; the exchange rates are provided dynamically via a third-party source, consequently, the University of London International Programmes is not responsible for their accuracy.

*Laws Dissertation and Laws Skills Portfolio

The Laws Dissertation is now available to all students as a Level 6 optional module. To accommodate this change the Laws Skills Pathway 1 and Laws Skills Pathway 2 pathways have been discontinued and those who need to complete one of these pathways will simply register for the Laws Skills Portfolio (LSP). You only need to complete the LSP if: a. you want a Qualifying Law Degree (QLD) and b. your effective date of registration was before 30 November 2014 and c. you passed the Tort law module before May 2016. You may also choose the Laws Dissertation option and you can then use your dissertation as the basis for your LSP. If you do not choose the Laws Dissertation option you will need to write a short essay as the basis for your LSP.

Please see the Programme Regulations for further information.

When to pay

The application fee is payable when you make your application. The closing date for applications is 1 October. If you meet the entrance requirements, you will be invited to register.

The initial registration fee is payable in order to be registered with the University as an International Programmes student. The closing dates for LLB registration and Certificate of Higher Education in Common Law registration are 30 November and 31 October respectively.

The examination fee is payable when you choose to enter an examination. Examination entries are accepted from mid-December to the closing date of 1 February. The examination fees also apply to students entering resit or referred papers in November after the May or June examinations.

The continuing registration fee is payable in the second and subsequent years of registration at the time when you confirm the modules that you will be registered for during that year. The closing date for continuing registration is 1 November.

The Laws Skills Portfolio (LSP) (see * above) is payable at the time of completing your final year continuing registration and must be paid by the date specified in the continuing registration invite letter.

An application fee may be payable if you wish to have prior learning considered for accreditation on, or transfer to, the degree programme. A full year’s transfer fee is payable if a whole year of prior learning is transferred to the degree. Such applications may be made throughout the year.

An extension of registration fee is payable if you are permitted to extend your period of registration for a stand-alone Individual module. Such requests may be made throughout the year.

**A late registration fee of £100 will be charged if payment is not received by the deadlines specified for initial or continuing registration.

How to pay

All University fees must be paid in pounds sterling (GBP). The University accepts:

  • Western Union - Quick Pay.
  • Credit/debit card (Visa, MasterCard, Maestro, Electron, JCB).
  • Sterling banker's draft/cheque.
  • International money/postal order.

Further details are given in payment methods.

Other costs

In addition to fees payable to the University, you should budget for textbooks (this may well be in the region of £300 per year if you are taking four modules in one year) and the cost of any course or tuition you choose to take or (for the Certificate of Higher Education in Common Law) are required to take.

You should also budget for the fee levied by your local examination centre. Examination centre fees are not included within the fees set out above. This fee will vary from centre to centre and you should contact your proposed examination centre(s) for details of their fees to factor them in to the overall cost of completing the programme. Find contact details for all our examination centres.

The University of London is only responsible for the examination centre fee charged at London centres. You will be charged £60 per sitting when using London examination centres.

Note

Fees are subject to annual revision and typically may be increased by up to 5% per annum. The University reserves the right to amend previously announced fees, if necessary. Generally, students whose fees are paid by sponsors will be expected to correspond directly with their sponsor regarding fees. The University can provide an invoice, if needed, upon request. Materials will not be despatched and VLE access will not be available until fees have been received. For a full list fees that may be applicable, please see the fee schedule.

Please use the enquiries form for any questions: http://enquiries.londoninternational.ac.uk

Assessment

Assessment

Note: Students are advised to consult the General Regulations, Programme Regulations and Module Descriptors for details about Assessment.

All modules (except the LLB final-year Dissertation option) are assessed entirely by written examinations at the end of each stage of study.

Examinations are held in May/June at local centres in over 180 different countries including London (please see the Assessment and examinations section of our website for further details).

All summative assessment is set and marked by academics appointed by the International Programmes as Chief Examiners/Examiners, and is marked to the same standards as for students studying in the UK at one of the colleges of the University of London.

See Quality and Standards for more information.

Requirements

Academic Requirements

To satisfy the entrance requirements for the LLB (and for Individual Modules) you must:

*Applications will be considered from applicants who do not meet the normal minimum age requirement for admission. Each application will be considered on an individual basis, and the decision taken at the discretion of the University of London.

If you are not automatically eligible then you will be individually considered by the Admissions Panel. The Admissions Panel will consider qualifications which are not published under the Qualifications for Entrance Schedule, incomplete qualifications (e.g. diplomas / degrees) and substantial relevant work experience. If we cannot accept you with your current qualifications and experience, we will advise you what qualifications you could take in order to become eligible in the future.

Graduate entry to the LLB

The following are eligible to apply for graduate entry:
  • Graduates holding an undergraduate degree from an acceptable university in the United Kingdom or any other European country or in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, the Caribbean, China, Colombia, Ecuador, Fiji, Ghana, Hong Kong SAR, Israel, Japan, Kenya, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mexico, New Zealand, Nigeria, Peru, Singapore, Sri Lanka, South Africa, South Korea, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, Uruguay, Venezuela or Zimbabwe. 
  • Graduates holding an undergraduate degree from an acceptable university in Bangladesh which is at least two-years full time in duration plus a Master’s degree from an acceptable university in Bangladesh which is at least two-years full time in duration. 
  • Graduates holding an undergraduate degree from an acceptable university in India which is at least three-years full time in duration.
  • Graduates holding an undergraduate degree from an acceptable university in Pakistan which is at least four-years full time in duration or graduates holding a 2 or 3 year bachelor’s degree plus a Master’s degree.
  • Graduates holding an undergraduate degree from a regionally accredited institution in the USA. Applications from students with other degrees not listed above will be considered at the discretion of the University. Professional qualifications cannot be considered for graduate entry. Please contact us if you would like further advice about eligibility for graduate entry.
  • Graduates holding a professional degree from an acceptable university in Sri Lanka.
  • Graduates holding a bachelor’s degree (honours) from an acceptable university in Sierra Leone.

Certificate of Higher Education in Common Law

To be eligible to register for the CertHE Common Law you must:

  • normally* be aged 18 years of age or older before 1 September in the year you register with the University and
  • be admitted to a course of instruction at a teaching institution which has been recognised for this purpose by the University of London (for further details see advice about choosing an institution).

Entrance onto the CertHE Common Law is determined locally by University of London recognised teaching institutions. All candidates are required to sit an entrance test and attend an interview at a recognised teaching institution in order to assess their suitability for the programme. Each institution will have their own admissions criteria. Candidates should contact their chosen institution directly for this information.

English language requirement

The language of instruction, reading and assessment is English. To succeed on our programmes you need a good level of competence in English. If you doubt your ability in written or spoken English we advise you take a course and test in English language before enrolling on the programme.

Required standard of English

You will usually meet the English language requirement for undergraduate programmes if you:

  • hold a UK GCSE / GCE O level in English at grade C or above
  • have five years secondary schooling taught solely in English or have passed GCE A levels or IB in essay-based subjects
  • have passed an International Foundation programme that permits entry onto a recognised UK bachelor's degree
  • hold a full Postgraduate award, or a full first degree or Associate degree taught and examined in English from an institute that is acceptable to the University
  • have passed, within the past three years, an Associate degree, Diploma or Higher Diploma awarded by an acceptable institute / polytechnic / university in Hong Kong, Malaysia or Singapore, or
  • have passed, within the past three years, a test of proficiency in English language from an organisation acceptable to the University.

Where an applicant does not meet the required English language level but believes they can demonstrate the required level for admission the University may, at its discretion, consider the application.

Please note if an applicant satisfies one of the above conditions yet provides evidence of a test of proficiency in English language, awarded within the past three years, which is below the University’s minimum requirements then they will be required to retake such a test before being offered admission.

The Am I qualified page has more information, including Qualifications for Entrance, which lists some of the qualifications recognised by the University of London International Programmes.

Recognition of prior study

The University will assess all requests for credit transfer/Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) on a case by case basis and a fee is payable. For further details see the accreditation of prior learning section of the website.

For programme specific guidance on the recognition of prior learning and credit transfer, see the Programme Regulations.

Computer Requirements

Students will require regular access to a computer with an internet connection to use the International Programmes website and the Student Portal. These are where many of the programme’s study resources are located. Through the Student Portal you can register as a student, enter exams and use your programme’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

The VLE provides you with electronic learning materials, access to the University of London Online Library, networking opportunities, and other resources.

It is suggested that the computer should have at least the following minimum specification:

  • a web browser (the latest version of Firefox, Chrome or Internet Explorer). This must accept cookies and have JavaScript enabled
  • screen resolution of 1024 x 768 or greater
  • sufficient bandwidth to download documents of at least 2 MB

and the following applications installed:

  • a word processor that accepts Microsoft Word formats (.doc)
  • Adobe Acrobat Reader, or other PDF reader.
Academic leaders

Academic direction - Laws - LLB

The University of London Undergraduate Laws Programme is governed academically by the six University of London Colleges with Law Schools or Departments. Collectively, they are known as the Laws Consortium. The six Colleges are: Birkbeck, King’s College London, The London School of Economics and Political Science, Queen Mary, SOAS, and UCL (University College London).

Academic leaders

Simon Askey

Simon Askey

Director of Undergraduate Laws Programme

As Director of the Undergraduate Laws Programme, Simon is responsible for the academic co-ordination of the assessment process and matters relating to student progression and performance. His role also involves management; administration; regulatory and committee work; inspections; and elements of marketing and ‘ambassadorial’ activity. Simon also leads on the skills agenda and the development of the Laws Skills Portfolio.

Read Simon's full academic profile.

Tracey Varnava

Deputy Director, Undergraduate Laws Programme

As Deputy Director of the Undergraduate Laws Programme, Tracey is involved in the development and implementation of strategy and policies to support the ongoing enhancement of the Laws programme, with particular responsibility for the management and development of compulsory modules. She also advises on quality assurance and regulatory matters and contributes to the review and enhancement of information and support provided to students and registered teaching centres.

Read Tracey's full academic profile.

Patricia McKellar

Associate Director, Undergraduate Laws Programme

As Associate Director of the Undergraduate Laws Programme, Patricia drives development and implementation of the learning, teaching and assessment strategy specifically in relation to the embedding of e-learning technologies and the development of an interactive learning environment. Working very closely with colleagues in the Laws team Patricia has particular responsibility for guiding and supporting the college-based academic staff in implementing the strategy in their particular modules.

Read Patricia's full academic profile.


Apply online

Laws blog

Visit the Laws blog.

Student blog

Blogs
Read blog posts from our students.

Ernest Obese LLB Graduate with Simon Askey London Connection Q&A: Ernest Obese talks about life in the military, the trials of studying independently and his hopes for the future of Africa.

Contact an alumni ambassador:

Sohana Chowdhury
Sohana Chowdury Alumni Ambassador for Bangladesh
I was born and brought up in Dhaka. It is the small and busy capital city of Bangladesh. Bangladesh is still a...

Alumni Inspiration: Nasim Jalili, LLB - Canada

Bachelor of Laws (LLB) graduate Nasim Jalili, of Canada, shares how the flexibility of the University of London programme allowed her to balance study with work and family life. The interview was filmed at the University of London International Programmes Graduation Ceremony at London's Barbican Centre. Find out more about the LLB.

How my law degree is helping my music career - Jay Walia

Singer and TV host Jay Walia shares why his law degree from the University of London has proved useful in the entertainment industry. Jay studied for his LLB at ATC in Kuala Lumpur.