Module Convenors and Associate Tutors

Each module of the MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies is developed and run by specialists in the field. Module Convenors and Associate Tutors provide academic advice and support to their tutor groups by leading online discussions, providing feedback on online activities (‘E-tivities’) and the final assessment and advising on reading materials and other resources related to each module on the programme.

The Module Convenors and Associate Tutors for the programme are:

Matthew Scott
Matthew Scott
Module tutor: RPM010 Protecting human rights, refugees and displaced persons in international law (core module)

Matthew is a UK-qualified solicitor and a doctoral candidate at the Faculty of Law at Lund University in Sweden. His research examines the scope of the non-refoulement obligation in the context of disasters and climate change. His research is part-funded by the European Refugee Fund and he is part of the Lund/Uppsala Migration Law Network (LUMIN).

He teaches at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels in asylum and immigration law and has delivered external training under the auspices of the Odysseus Academic Network.

Before commencing doctoral research he practiced asylum and immigration law at the Immigration Advisory Service in the United Kingdom. He has also worked for the Australian Department of Immigration and Citizenship.

Nikolas Feith Tan
Nikolas Feith Tan
Module tutor: RPM010 Protecting human rights, refugees and displaced persons in international law (core module)

Nikolas Feith Tan is a PhD fellow at the Danish Institute for Human Rights and Aarhus University in international refugee law. Nikolas' doctorate looks at international cooperation and access to asylum under international human rights and refugee law.

Nikolas has taught refugee and human rights law at the Aarhus University, Aalborg University and University of London. In addition, he acts as a legal advisor and consultant to the Danish Refugee Council on international asylum complaints and policy. An Australian lawyer admitted to practice, Nikolas is a former officer of the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

He holds a Master of Law from the University of Copenhagen and Bachelors of Law and Arts (Political Science) from the University of Melbourne. Nikolas is currently a guest scholar at the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law in Lund.

Dr Sarah Deardoff-Miller
Dr Sarah Deardoff Miller
Module tutor: RPM210 Securing refugee protection in practice

Sarah Deardorff Miller received her doctorate in international relations at Oxford University in 2014, where she focused on the role of UNHCR in protracted refugee situations. Her research interests include the politics of forced migration, protracted refugee situations, international humanitarian organisations and global governance. She has worked with various non-governmental organisations in Africa and Asia, and has worked and published with think tanks and research institutions in the USA and Europe. In 2015 she was a Franklin Fellow at the US Department of State. She is also teaching with the American University’s School of International Service, and continues to consult, research and write on refugee/internally displaced persons (IDP)-related issues.

Dr James Smith
Dr James Smith
Module co-convenor: RPM280 Displacement, healthcare and humanitarian action

James is a British medical doctor with an MSc in Global Health and Development from University College London. He maintains an active research fellowship with the Health in Humanitarian Crises Centre at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) and now works for MSF Switzerland’s Unité de Recherche sur les Enjeux et Pratiques Humanitaires (UREPH), where his interests include humanitarian ethics, evidence-based humanitarian response, the intersection between migration and humanitarian action, and aspects of global health governance.

Kat Eghdamian
Kat Eghdamian
Module tutor: RPM020 An introduction to forced migration studies (core module)

Kat Eghdamian is a specialist researcher and consultant on refugees and forced migration, religion, and minority rights issues. Her current research examines the relationship between religious identity and experiences of international displacement, with a focus on religious minorities among Syrian refugee populations across the Middle East and Europe.

Currently a PhD candidate (ESRC Scholar) at University College London (UCL), Kat is also a Fellow at the Centre for Religion, Conflict and the Public Domain at the University of Groningen and a Research Associate for the Centre on Religion and Global Affairs. She holds postgraduate degrees from the London School of Economics and Political Science and the University of Oxford.

Nicholas Maple
Nicholas Maple
Module tutor: RPM020 An introduction to forced migration studies (core module)

Nicholas Maple is a PhD candidate at the Refugee Law Initiative, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London, under the supervision of Dr David Cantor. His PhD research examines reception policies in the global South and how they interact with the international refugee regime and its core norms, with a particular focus on freedom of movement. He is the Academic Support Officer for the MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies and also teaches on the core module RPM020 An introduction to refugee and forced migration studies.

Nicholas has nearly two years’ experience working in the field as an advocate for organisations such as Asylum Access, the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) and UNHCR. He has worked as a researcher at the Refugee Law Initiative, completed consultancy work for organisations such as Chatham House and had work published by UNHCR.

Dr Christina Oelgemoller
Dr Christina Oelgemoller
Module tutor: RPM020 An introduction to forced migration studies (core module)

Christina Oelgemoller is currently a Lecturer in International Relations at Loughborough University. Prior to this she was in the School of Global Studies at the University of Sussex, during which time Christina was awarded her DPhil. Her doctoral work is an interdisciplinary study in Geography and International Relations entitled ‘Migration management: the radical violence of the international politics of migration’. In this work, questions are asked about the construction of the ‘illegal migrant’ as a particular political subject, framed in the context of changes in the doctrine formation of international migration since the 1980s on the back of – among other factors – the Indochina refugee crisis. ‘Migration management’ raises important questions about normative violence, governance and ethics. Christina has a multidisciplinary background, with degrees in Social Policy, Politics and Law; Intercultural Work, Human Rights and Conflict Management; and Research Methods awarded by Universities in both Germany and the UK. Outside of academia she has worked for several years in organisations including the UNHCR Branch Office in Berlin and an International NGO in Geneva.

Christina’s research is driven by questions about statecraft, democracy and ethics, around two specific areas of research interest: constructions of political subjectivity and equality (with a focus on international migrants/forced migration), and doctrine formation in international multilateralism and diplomacy (with a focus on post-conflict reconstruction and missing persons).

Pauline Endres de Oliveira
Pauline Endres de Oliveira
Module tutor: RPM010 Protecting human rights, refugees and displaced persons in international law (core module)

Pauline Endres de Oliveira is a human rights lawyer from Berlin, who worked as Consultant for UNHCR Germany from 2013 - 2015. She is an editorial board member of the Informationsverbund Asyl und Migration (asyl.net), Germany’s main independent institution providing background information for asylum and migration practitioners. She is a lecturer in asylum and migration law at the Humboldt University Berlin (Refugee Law Clinic) and board member of Amnesty International Germany.

Pauline studied law at the Humboldt University Berlin and the Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, with legal traineeships in Brazil, London and Rome. She is now enrolled as PhD fellow at the University in Gießen (supervisor: Prof. Dr. Jürgen Bast), focusing on the topic of legal access to international protection in the EU. In 2016, she was a visiting study fellow at the Refugee Studies Centre in Oxford.

Eleni Karageorgiou - academic tutor SAS
Eleni Karageorgiou
Module tutor: RPM010 Protecting human rights, refugees and displaced persons in international law (core module)

Eleni Karageorgiou is a qualified lawyer (Athens Bar Association) and a PhD candidate in public international law at Lund University, Sweden. Her research explores the functions and implications of the principle of solidarity and responsibility sharing in EU asylum law and policies and forms part of the Lund/Uppsala Migration Law Network (L/UMIN).

Prior to commencing her doctoral studies, Eleni worked for the Greek Asylum Appeal Committees and before that, in migration law practice. Her research interests include theory of international law, international and regional human rights systems, non-citizens’ rights, refugee law and gender, the Common European Asylum System, ECtHR and CJEU asylum jurisprudence.

Cory Rodgers - academic tutor at SAS
Cory Rodgers
Module co-convenor: RPM280 Displacement, healthcare and humanitarian action

Module tutor: Researching Refugees, research methods component of the Dissertation (core module)

Cory Rodgers is in the final year of doctoral studies at the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology in Oxford. His research investigates the intersections of migration, livelihood change and identity among mobile populations in East Africa, including both refugees and pastoralists.

He conducted 18 months of fieldwork with Turkana herders and their refugee neighbours in northwestern Kenya. He is currently involved as a consultant in a project funded by UNHCR and WFP to study self-reliance and food distribution strategies in the new Kalobeyei refugee settlement.

He has also reported on legal protections for refugees' property and assets, including the black-market sale of shelters in refugee camps and settlements. Cory received his undergraduate degree from the University of Pittsburgh (USA) and a Master's degree in Medical Anthropology from the University of Oxford with funding from a Rhodes Scholarship.